Gas station without pumps

2014 July 28

New mesh seat finished and tested

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 17:50
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In Need new mesh seat for recumbent, I mentioned that I needed a new seat for my recumbent, as the one I’ve been using since 1999 (15 years!) is completely worn out.  I repaired the seat once before (replacing part of the front strap), but the seat was not worth repairing again, as the warp has worn away in several spots across the middle of the seat (apparently abrasion with the central strap behind the seat).

I bought new hardware and straps from Country Brook Design (through Amazon, since the prices were the same and the shipping seemed cheaper than a direct order from Country Brook Design.
I got

There was $7.08 shipping and handling on the order from Country Brook Design.

I also bought a yard of 840×1680 denier leno-woven mesh fabric from ahh.biz, but when I went to check the price again, it is now a “discontinued product”—I must have bought their last yard—including shipping the total bill was $20.20.

Since I already had sewing thread, the total cost for making the new seat was $76.11, but I have a lot of materials left over (the 25 triglide slides, 16 buckles, a little bit of seat-belt webbing and reflective webbing, and most of the leno-lock mesh).  I could have bought a seat from Greg Peek at Longbikes for $149.00 plus $15 shipping and handling, so making my own was less than half the price, despite having a lot of excess parts.  Also, my new seat has fancy red straps that are reflective at night, and the new straps are polyester rather than nylon, so should perform a bit better (less stretching, more UV resistant, faster drying).

I decided to use dual-adjustable heavy-duty buckles, so that they would be less likely to break and easier to replace if they did break (no sewing of the buckles). I also ran the 1″ straps all the way across the seat at the top, bottom, and middle (3 of the 7 horizontal straps), as these seem to be the high-stress parts of the design (based on the stretching in the old seat).  I ran the warp horizontally, as I thought that would result in less stretching than having the warp vertical (as on my old seat)—I’ll let you know in 15 years how that works out (if I remember).

The new seat came out a bit heavier than the old one (545g rather than 470g), probably because of the straps across and heavier plastic hardware. The extra 75g is completely irrelevant give how much my bike and panniers weighs.

I used my wife’s sewing machine (my treadle machine needs a new leather belt, or tightening of the old belt).  My wife’s machine had no trouble with the mesh or the reflective webbing, but going through the seat-belt webbing sometimes caused it to have problems, particularly where it had to go through two layers of seat-belt webbing, a layer of reflective webbing, and the mesh.  I think that the treadle machine would have had less trouble, but I didn’t want to take the time to fix the belt on the treadle machine.

The seat came out looking ok, and I took a short ride on it today to buy groceries—it is as comfortable as the old seat and much nicer looking:

In this side view, you can't see much of the mesh seat—just the straps on the sides.

In this side view, you can’t see much of the mesh seat—just the straps on the sides.

From the front, the red straps match the red paint fairly well.

From the front, the red straps match the red paint fairly well.

By using a flash on my camera, I could light up the reflective straps even in the day time.

By using a flash on my camera, I could light up the reflective straps even in the day time.

From the rear, the reflective straps should add a fair amount of visibility at night.

From the rear, the reflective straps should add a fair amount of visibility at night.

The heavy-duty dual-adjustable buckles seem to work well.  By keeping the straps fairly short, I did not need to use the triglides or keepers to hold the ends of the straps in place—they aren't long enough to be a nuisance.

The heavy-duty dual-adjustable buckles seem to work well. By keeping the straps fairly short, I did not need to use the triglides or keepers to hold the ends of the straps in place—they aren’t long enough to be a nuisance.

UCSB orientation

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 11:37
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Last week I finally had an opportunity to visit UCSB, where my son will be going to college in the Fall.  This college visit was a bit different from other ones we did together, as he had already filed his statement of intent to register (in UC jargon, the “SIR”).  So we were not deciding whether UCSB was a good place to apply, or whether to accept an admissions offer—this was an orientation session for new freshmen and their parents.

Because we don’t drive, and the Santa Barbara airport is very expensive to fly to from anywhere but LA (and somewhat expensive even from LA), we took Amtrak to Santa Barbara.  There are multiple ways to get from Santa Cruz to UCSB by train, but we took the simplest and most familiar: Highway 17 express to San Jose ($5), Coast Starlight to Santa Barbara ($51, but the price is higher if you don’t buy the tickets far enough ahead of time), MTD bus 11 to UCSB ($1.75).  (Note: the number 11 bus is not as fast as the 24X or 15X express bus, but those don’t run on Sundays, which is when we were going to Santa Barbara.  The Coast Starlight is a rather slow train, and there are bus+train combinations that are faster, but both my son and I tend to get motion sick on buses, so we preferred the train.  One could take the Greyhound to Santa Barbara for only $37, but that is about 6 hours on the bus.  One could also take Greyhound to Salinas ($12), then Amtrak 4740 bus to San Luis Obispo and the Pacific Surfliner to Goleta ($42), and MTD bus 15X  (or walk a mile and take the 11 on weekends) to UCSB ($1.75).  One could also take the Coast Starlight from Salinas to Santa Barbara ($12+$39+$1.75), reducing the bus time to the same as taking the Highway 17 express, and the bus to Salinas is probably less of a roller-coaster ride than the bus to San Jose.  The connections are not tight, so no time is saved by catching the train in Salinas—the extra time is spent waiting at the Amtrak station in Salinas.

Because it was a two-day orientation, they put us up (separately) in dorms for the intervening night.  Because we were using Amtrak to get to Santa Barbara, we needed an extra night before and after, which we also spent in a (different) dorm, managed as the UCSB Summer Inn.  All the dorms were in Manzanita Village, which is the dorm complex my son has requested.  The dorms were spacious with lots of closet space, but a bit too warm—a fan would be a useful addition to the fall dorm supplies.  The mattresses were also a bit too firm for my taste—my son may want to get a softer foam pad to put on top of the mattress.

Bus service for UCSB is not bad on weekdays, but is a bit skimpy on weekends.  Even at its best, it is not as frequent as UCSC bus service. Of course, the UCSB campus is more compact than the UCSC campus, and UCSB students mostly live on campus or a short walk away from campus in Isla Vista, so bus service is not as necessary.  Also, the UCSB campus and surrounding area is flat, so bicycling is very easy (even with the low-efficiency “beach cruisers” that southern California finds fashionable).

UCSB seems to take bicycling fairly seriously in terms of infrastructure.  There are no roads through campus, but there is a major bikeway and lots of bike parking:

UCSB has bike paths on which bicyclists have priority over pedestrians, and traffic is heavy enough during the school year that they found it useful to put roundabouts at a couple of the major intersections of bike paths.

UCSB has bike paths on which bicyclists have priority over pedestrians, and traffic is heavy enough during the school year that they found it useful to put roundabouts at a couple of the major intersections of bike paths.

Bikes have the right of way on the paths, and (unlike roads) the pedestrian crosswalks do not give the pedestrians right of way.  There are warnings and textured strips to caution the pedestrians.  Bicyclists are expected to walk their bikes when on the pedestrian paths (with frequent warnings about heavy fines), but this rule seems to be routinely ignored.

Bikes have the right of way on the paths, and (unlike roads) the pedestrian crosswalks do not give the pedestrians right of way. There are warnings and textured strips to caution the pedestrians. Bicyclists are expected to walk their bikes when on the pedestrian paths (with frequent warnings about heavy fines), but this rule seems to be routinely ignored.

There is even a separate skateboard lane on one of the main campus paths (taking up part of a wide walkway and paralleling a divided bike path).

There is even a separate skateboard lane on one of the main campus paths (taking up part of a wide walkway and paralleling a divided bike path).

Bike parking is copious, often with seas of bike parking near classroom buildings.

Bike parking is copious, often with seas of bike parking near classroom buildings.

Most of the bike parking is of a style that alternates high and low, intended for allowing tight packing of the bikes without handlebars interfering.  There is an adequate locking point for the frame, but not for the rear wheel.

Most of the bike parking is of a style that alternates high and low, intended for allowing tight packing of the bikes without handlebars interfering. There is an adequate locking point for the frame, but not for the rear wheel.

In a couple of places, the "low" version of the bike parking is installed diagonally, where there is not sufficient space for the bikes to be perpendicular.  This view shows the locking loop beside the wheel-holder clearly.

In a couple of places, the “low” version of the bike parking is installed diagonally, where there is not sufficient space for the bikes to be perpendicular. This view shows the locking loop beside the wheel-holder clearly.

In a few places, UCSB has wheel-bender racks that provide neither support for the bikes nor adequate locking points—these were clearly selected by someone who did not park a bicycle.

In a few places, UCSB has wheel-bender racks that provide neither support for the bikes nor adequate locking points—these were clearly selected by someone who did not park a bicycle.

Although the campus is compact and easy to navigate in, it is not small. A walk from the dorms my son hopes to stay in (Manzanita village) to the College of Engineering (where many of the faculty he might do research with have offices) is about a mile. Given the distances, the flat terrain, and the mild weather, bicycling is probably the best way to get around campus.

I saw a number of cyclists at UCSB, but very few wearing helmets. We were warned that even experienced bicyclists should probably avoid cycling on campus for the first two weeks of Fall quarter, as there were a lot of bike crashes during that period, often caused by new cyclists who did not know what they were doing. It seems that UCSB’s infrastructure efforts are not matched by bike safety education efforts. Bike theft is also a major problem on campus—the suggestion is to get an ugly old bike and use a good lock. There is a sale of abandoned bikes during Welcome Week in the fall, and my son will probably get a bike then, rather than lugging his from home. I think that a 3-speed with front and rear brakes is probably the ideal bike for UCSB conditions—easier to maintain than derailleurs, but more efficient than a one-speed beach cruiser.

UCSB has a few more students than UCSC (22,225 students in Fall 2013 vs. 17,203 at UCSC), and a higher proportion of grad students (12.9% vs. 8.8% at UCSC).  At the orientation, UCSB claimed to have the highest proportion of undergrads of any R1 research university, but they achieved this status only by using a non-standard definition of an R1 university, using the 62 invitation-only members of the Association of American Universities, rather than the 108 “RU/VH: Research Universities (very high research activity)” in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, which is the more commonly used definition of “R1 university”.  UCSC is on that bigger list, and probably does deserve the status of the R1 university with the highest ratio of undergrads, which UCSB was improperly claiming.

Although UCSB has only 23.4% more undergrads than UCSC, they have a few much larger class sizes.  They have several lecture halls seating 300 or more students (Campbell Hall @ 860, Isla Vista Theater 1 @529, Lotte Lehman Concert Hall @468, Chem 1179 @354, Buchanan 1910 @306).  UCSC has 3 classrooms with 300 or more and none over 500 (Classroom Unit 2 @472, Media Theater @382, and Humanities 3 Rm 206 @301).  Unless he changes his schedule, my son will have a class in Campbell Hall in the fall: Linear Algebra.  His other classes will be tiny, all being College of Creative Studies computer science classes for freshmen, so having 10–20 students.  I’ve been suggesting to him that he delay linear algebra by a quarter or two, so that he can take the CCS physics series with the CCS physics majors.  It isn’t clear that they’ll allow him to do that, but he neglected to tell his computer science adviser that he was interested, and the CCS physics adviser was not around to talk to, so he’ll have to ask about that by e-mail, if he decides to try it.

The orientation was carefully designed to separate students from the parents, with the students talking with advisers and with other students, and the faculty hearing from administrators (and a few students).  There were a few combined sessions for students and parents, but not many (campus tour, welcome assembly, half the College of Creative Studies meeting, an Education Abroad Program presentation).  Supposedly we could eat meals together, but my son managed to make friends with a few of the other CCS students, so he had both lunches and the Monday dinner with them—I only ate with him for the Tuesday breakfast.  Incidentally, the dining hall had fairly good food—better than any of the other campus dining halls we’ve eaten at—and we were told by students that this was not a special “for the parents” thing, but that the dining hall food was routinely that varied and that good.

Most of the presentations had very little new content for me, as they were aimed mainly at parents who had not been to college (UCSB, like all the UCs, takes pride in what a large proportion of their students are the first in their families to attend college).  I did pick up a few tidbits of useful information, like getting my son to add me to the e-mails about the bills from UCSB, so that I can transfer the funds from the Scholarshare 529 plan without the delay of waiting for him to forward the bills to me.

The meeting with the CCS students and a couple of the CCS faculty was worthwhile, but sending us to the Letters and Sciences panel discussion afterwards was a waste of time—I would rather have had a chance to hear from the engineering faculty or students.

The only really good presentation was the “Packing, Prepping, and Parting” presentation for parents Monday night.  It was very entertaining, but made the strong assumption that all students would come by car.  Since packing and prepping are even more challenging for those coming by plane, bus, or train, it would have been useful to spend a little time on that. There was a brief mention of the Amtrak station in Goleta (which serves the Pacific Surfliner only, not the Coast Starlight) and no mention that MTD bus service to the train stations is limited on weekends (the move-in days), since the 15X doesn’t run on weekends.

The presentation “your student’s first year” was so generic as to be useless.  I was also rather surprised to see some copyrighted cartoons copied off the web without permission (the watermarks to show that these were unlicensed were still clearly visible).  UCSB is not so poor that they need to steal intellectual property from cartoonists, and it sends a very bad message to students about plagiarism and intellectual property to be so cavalier about copyright in an official university presentation.

The EAP (education abroad program) was one of 7 “co-curricular workshops” that we could choose among to attend together, none of which sounded very interesting.  My son fell asleep during it and I nearly did—they could have provided a lot more content in a much less boring presentation.

The Tuesday afternoon was dedicated to registering for classes, but the CCS students got that done early, so we had the afternoon to wander around campus, taking our own tour of the science and engineering buildings, which had only been pointed out as being “over there” in the general campus tour.  We did not go down to the beach, though that might have been a pleasant option to cool off.  We rarely get to the beach in Santa Cruz either—it is not big on our list of fun things to do.

On Sunday night and Tuesday night we ate in Isla Vista.  We had Indian food at Naan Stop Sunday night and Vietnamese food at Pho Bistro Tuesday night.  Both were adequate of their kind and clearly local rather than chains.  Isla Vista has about 30 eateries, all of “college student” styles, so there are places to go if the dorm food gets too repetitive, though the variety is somewhat limited.  Isla Vista does not have much else in the way of retail—students are expected to go 2 ½ miles to Kmart, Costco, Home Depot, and other shopping-center stores in Goleta for anything other than convenience store or bike store stuff.

Overall, my impression of UCSB is that it will be a good place for my son to go to school.  The CCS program gives him some small classes, good access to research opportunities, very flexible general-ed requirements, and an easy way to meet fellow geeks. He’ll have to put up with a few large classes (like linear algebra), but he’ll be past them fairly quickly if he makes good choices. The campus is well set up for bicycling, and it is not overly influenced by fraternity or sports culture (though both are more accessible than at UCSC).  The culture is a little more “southern California” than he is used to, but I don’t know if he’ll even notice the difference, other than the greater exposure of skin, which is driven more by the climate than by the culture.

 

2014 July 14

Need new mesh seat for recumbent

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 21:28
Tags: , , ,

I need to replace the mesh seat on my recumbent bicycle, because one of the buckles snapped yesterday. The mesh itself is badly stretched and abraded, and a few of the webbing straps are badly worn, so it is not worth repairing the seat—it’s replacement time. I can still ride the bike, but it isn’t as comfortable with the front strap no longer functional.

Now I’m trying to figure out exactly what fabric and parts to get.  One person on the Ryan owner’s club mailing list conveniently provided a parts list recently, though the seat I have currently does not exactly match his list (for example, I have all 1″ webbing, no 3/4″ webbing).  Here are some things I’m trying to decide:

  • What type of mesh should I get?  He recommended black Leno Lock mesh from Outdoor Wilderness Fabrics MESHBLK at $14.03/yard, but I’m also considering Phifertex Vinyl Mesh at $12.95/yard, which is available in many colors, or Phifertex Plus at $17.95/yard, which would provide less stretch, but also less ventilation. The Phifertex Plus is sold as a sling mesh (capable of supporting a person’s weight), but the others are not.  I suspect that any fabric rated for seats will have too little ventilation for the recumbent. The leno weave fabrics are likely to provide more stability in an open mesh, because the warp threads twist around each other, rather than running straight, locking the weft threads in place. The bentrideronline forum posts generally recommend the Leno lock mesh from Outdoor Wilderness Fabrics, so I’ll probably go with that, even though it is a bit too stretchy.
  • What sort of webbing should I get?  The edges of the seat use 2″ webbing to stabilize the seat and attach the straps, plus a couple of diagonals from the center front to part way up the sides, to support the weight of the rider.  The rest of the straps are 1″ wide.  But should they be nylon, polypropylene, or polyester straps?  Nylon has high strength, but is rather stretchy. Polypropylene has less stretch, but poor abrasion resistance and UV resistance, and polyester has the best UV resistance and the least stretch (about half as much as nylon webbing of the same weight under the same stress).  It also doesn’t absorb water, and is more resistant to mildew and rot.
    I can get black polyester 1″ webbing for about 35¢/foot, and 2″ black polyester webbing for about 75¢/foot, but colors are a little more expensive: I can get 10 yards of red 1″ with reflective stripes for $18.90, or plain red for $1.48/yard. For a bicycle application, the reflective stripes may be a useful safety feature. Red 2″ seatbelt webbing would be about $10 for 5 yards.
  • I also need to get buckles for the 7 cross straps and the two straps that go over the top of the seat.  I’m undecided between simple side-release buckles (Fastex FSR1 59¢), and dual-pull side release buckles (generic GTSRD1 47¢) from Outdoor Wilderness Fabrics. Cam lock buckles (generic GCB1 46¢) are also a possibility. I’ll also want a a tri-glide for each loose strap end (generic GTG1 12¢).

So, unless I can get a new seat from the manufacturer of my bike (Longbikes in Colorado), even though they discontinued this model about 10 years ago, I’ll probably be making my own seat soon.  It’ll cost me about $50–60 for materials, but I suspect that an already sewn seat would cost more like $150, and I wouldn’t have the option of red straps with reflective stripes.

 

2013 August 31

Bike rack FAILs

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 13:15
Tags: ,

For years I’ve been collecting pictures of bike parking (good and bad), but I’ve not written about the racks much.  Recently I came across three excellent reviews of bad bike racks on the One woman. Many Bicycles. blog:

Bike Rack FAIL: The Jaws of Death Torture Rack

Bike Rack FAIL: The Throat Choke Torture Rack

Bike Rack FAIL: The Ankle Biter Torture Rack

Go read her posts about these poor excuses for bike parking devices. Note: none of these work at all with my recumbent bike.

There is an even worse design out there—various versions of the wheel-bender:

Here is a wheel-bender that I photographed at MIT a few years ago.  The main characteristic of a wheel bender is that it holds the bottom of the wheel without supporting the frame.  This maximizes the leverage for bending the wheel if the bike is knocked over.

Here is a wheel-bender that I photographed at MIT a few years ago. The main characteristic of a wheel bender is that it holds the bottom of the wheel without supporting the frame. This maximizes the leverage for bending the wheel if the bike is knocked over.

I see variants of these bike-damaging excuses for bike parking all over the place, but have not taken many pictures of them. The wheel benders are very cheap, can be squeezed into very little space, are visually unobtrusive, and are universally hated by bicyclists—those features make them popular with places that are required to put in bike parking but really want to discourage bicyclists—the nearest MacDonald’s has wheel-benders, for example. I do not patronize businesses that use them (unless forced to do so, and then I try to talk to the manager about their anti-bike design).

If readers of my blog are interested in seeing some of the bike parking pictures I’ve taken, let me know, and I’ll try to do posts of some of the more interesting ones.  Mostly I’ve taken pictures of good (or at least adequate) bike parking, but I do have some photos of common design or installation errors.

2013 February 5

Positive moments

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 04:07
Tags: ,

After feeling a bit down yesterday about needing to reboot my teaching in the Applied Circuits course after the quiz, I went to bed early, as  I needed to get up early this morning to judge a science fair at the K–8 school where my wife works.  I managed to fall asleep, but woke up again before 3:00 a.m., with my mind still running around in circles trying to come up with ways to get the students to learn what I want them to learn in the circuits class.  I’ve been getting insomnia a lot lately, and it is not at all helpful.

When reading some mindless fantasy novel did not help me shut down the monkey chatter and get back to sleep, I got up to catch up on e-mail and blog reading (mostly mindless stuff also, though I sometimes come across a good idea on the teacher blogs).  Reading e-mail when I have insomnia is a bit dangerous, as it often results in my finding out about a missed deadline or some bureaucratic emergency I have to deal with, leading to more lack of sleep. Tonight there were no new disasters, and I managed to clean out a few old e-mails that could be handled with a short reply or simply filed and forgotten.

I spent a little time reflecting on my day, looking for positives to cheer myself up a bit. There were a few:

  • I had gotten a draft started on the lab handout for next week (the FET and phototransistor lab), and gotten a number of schematics drawn for it.  They always take me more time than they should, so getting them done put me back on schedule for this lab handout—I should be able to get it done in time to release by Thursday evening, despite having two mornings this week spent on science fair judging.
  • My son had come up to campus early for his class, so that he could debug the data logger on the Windows machines.  It has not been showing the menus the way it is supposed to, but the bug only  occurs on Windows machines, so he couldn’t debug it at home (we’re a no-Windows household).  He quickly tracked down the bug—it seems to be a bug in Tk, though not one we could find mention of on the web—he’ll be asking about it on StackOverflow. He has a workaround figured out for it, but the workaround requires some refactoring, as he had associated “quit” functionality with code for the system menu, and it is adding to the system menu that is causing Windows to suppress the menubar.  Once he gets that problem fixed, he just has one Linux bug to track down and a little more documentation to do before he’s ready for his first official release.  So I’m quite pleased with the progress he’s making on the data logger.
  • On my way into work this morning, I saw bicyclist on the bike path staring disconsolately at his derailleur.  I stopped to ask if he needed help, and he said that his chain kept slipping out of gear.  I spent a minute asking diagnostic questions: just in the lowest gear? or in all gears?  Both derailleurs or just the rear?  When he said that it was in all gears and just the rear derailleur, I guessed that the problem was the cable adjustment, and looked for the barrel adjuster to adjust the cable housing length.  There wasn’t one.  At first this confused me—who would put a cable on a shifter without a length adjustment?  Then I looked more closely at the rear derailleur and realized that it had a screwdriver-dependent adjuster, rather than a barrel adjuster.  I’d not seen that on a bike before, but the bike looked like an old one (with shift levers on the downtube) and not particularly high quality, so it may have been a cheap design that did not survive in the marketplace.  I got out the screwdriver on my Swiss Army knife and turned the adjusting screw a quarter of a turn to lengthen the housing.  We checked the derailleur and it seemed to shift ok, so I suggested he take the bike to the Bike Co-op or the Bike Church to learn how to adjust the derailleur properly and continued up the hill.  At the top I waited half a minute to ask him as he rode by whether it was shifting ok now, and he thought that it was.  The total time added to my morning commute was about 3 minutes, and doing a good deed like that lifted my mood for a couple of hours.
  • In my lab office hours after class today, one of the students who had been having a little trouble with the soldering last Thursday needed to redo the board.  The one he’d been working on last Thursday had gotten solder in a couple of the holes before the components had been added, and we had delaminated one of the traces trying to clear the holes. I was able to borrow a soldering iron from another lab (they don’t want to leave soldering irons in the lab I use, because the students in the EE circuits class can’t be trusted not to burn themselves, I guess), and the student was able to unsolder the screw connector from the old board and solder up the new board without mishaps.  I helped a bit with unsoldering the screw connector. I even had an opportunity to teach him the resistor color code, because he had forgotten what resistance value they had used (bad lab notebook keeping) and asked me if there was any way to read the markings on the resistor to determine its value.  Luckily, the colors were unambiguous on the resistor he was using (some of the markings are unclear on the blue-bodied resistors), so we could read it easily as a 4.7MΩ resistor.  I didn’t tell him the other approach, which is to measure the resistor with an ohmmeter, since that method is unreliable when the resistor is in a circuit—it is easy for other current paths through the circuit to make the ohmmeter read low (or high, in the case of a parallel capacitor).  It’s probably a good thing I didn’t suggest that, as I just checked on my hysteresis oscillator board and an in-circuit measurement there is off by a factor of five.  In any case, he managed to solder the new board up and demo it fairly quickly.  I think that leaves just one or two students who still need to demo their working soldered boards.

So despite the setback of the quiz showing me that more pseudoteaching than teaching has been taking place this quarter, I did have several positive moments yesterday. I need to remind myself of the positives more often.

I’ll work for another half hour or so tonight (either on the lab handout or on some research code), then try to get back to sleep before getting up earlier than usual to do the science fair judging.

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