Gas station without pumps

2015 May 14

Blood pressure lab

Despite fairly poor prelab homework turned in, the first half of the blood pressure lab went well.  After seeing how poorly students were doing on breaking down the problem into pieces (perhaps the main transferable engineering skill I’m trying to get them to develop), I ended up giving them more explicit instructions on the board at the beginning of lab:

  1. calculate sensor voltage difference for 100mmHg with 3.3v power
  2. measure sensor voltage difference for 100mmHg with 3.3v power (also 0mmHg and -100mmHg)
  3. determine upper and lower inputs of voltage for instrumentation amp INA126P from the data sheet, using worst-case rather than typical specs (“worst-case” meaning the smallest remaining voltage range)
  4. use Vout-Vref = G(V+ – V) to determine maximum gain to avoid clipping if input swing is +-180mmHg (+-24kPa)
  5. compute needed gain resistor, wire it up (and virtual ground)
  6. measure voltage at output of instrumentation amp at 0, +100mmHg, -100mmHg
  7. compute gain needed in second stage to get maximum range (without clipping) at final output
  8. wire up op amp and measure final output voltage at 0, +100mmHg, -100mmHg
  9. What is Vout as function of pressure?
  10. record with the PteroDAQ a blood pressure measurement with pressure slowly decaying from 180mmHg down to 40mmHg (not too slowly, or your hand will get swollen).  Check for clipping at high end.  Check that you are using nearly the full range. Check that pulsations are visible when plotting the data.
  11. Use bandpass-filter.py to filter the first channel of the recording (later channels will be discarded)

I may have to put some version of these instructions in the book, though this sort of hand-holding is precisely what I’m trying to cut out in the “descaffolding”.  I’m afraid we’re training a generation of technicians rather than engineers—they’re good at following very explicit instructions, but not so good at breaking problems down into smaller problems.

With these explicit instructions, most of the students managed to get breadboard versions of the pressure sensor amplifiers working. I may have to help out bench 4, as it turned out that their pressure sensor seems to have a 0.7mV offset (which is pretty big—way out of spec).  They’ll have to decide whether to change benches to get a different sensor, compensate for the sensor offset electronically, or compensate for it in the post-processing of the data.  Any of these solutions would be acceptable, but they aren’t all equally easy.

The students needed less help than in previous years in the lab, so I think that having the students struggle with the prelabs, even if they don’t get the answers right, is helping make the lab time more efficient—they only have to get past a couple of misunderstandings, rather than trying to learn all the material for the first time in lab, as so many did the last couple of years.

In lecture on Wednesday, I went over blood pressure waveforms defining pulse rate, systolic pressure, and diastolic pressure, and talking about the frequency ranges of the pulse rate. I then explained to them how the filter program was run (many students still don’t know about the “<” and “>” conventions for standard in and standard out on command lines). I also showed the gnuplot trick that allows using standard out from a program in place of a file in a plot command:
plot '< python bandpass-filter.py < pressure.data' using 1:3 with lines

I did not explain how digital filters worked, but I did say why I chose Bessel filters (to preserve as much of the time-domain structure of the signal as possible).  In response to a question I also explained the effect that choosing 5th order filters had (the rolloff as f5 or f–5, rather than f1 or f–1 as with a first-order RC filter). I also explained that the computation required more and more precise numbers as the order got higher, and that 5th-order was a good tradeoff between needed precision and fast rolloff.

One thing that I didn’t get to was explaining that “filtfilt” does the filtering twice: once with time going forward and again with time running backwards. The time reversal cancels a lot of the distortion in the time domain (so the choice of Bessel filters is not crucial), but doing two passes also doubles the order of the filter, so that the rolloff is really f10 or f–10.

I did remember to tell students that they needed to have the scipy package installed in order to run the filter program, and that if their python was installed from python.org that they could probably just run “pip install scipy”. At least one student in the class is using the Anaconda installation of python, which already has scipy installed.

At the end of the lecture I had only 10 minutes left, so I did not get into the internals of instrumentation amplifiers (needed for the EKG lab at the end of the quarter) nor transimpedance amplifiers (needed for next week’s lab). Instead I covered the voltmeter impedance measurements I made last week, explaining how I did the measurements, how I did the fitting, and what the results were.  In particular, I mentioned that swapping the sets of leads changed the behavior, so the extra capacitance (beyond the 100pF of the meter itself) appears to be coming from the leads.  I sent the data files and gnuplot script to them via e-mail, after one student requested them.

1 Comment »

  1. […] lab (see Pressure-sensor lab went well, Class-D lab revision didn’t work, Blood pressure monitor, Blood pressure lab, and Blood pressure lab part 2 for descriptions of the old […]

    Pingback by Revised pressure sensor lab went very well | Gas station without pumps — 2016 May 3 @ 21:20 | Reply


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