Gas station without pumps

2015 June 14

More on nFET Miller plateau

Filed under: Circuits course,Data acquisition — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 22:09
Tags: , , , ,

In Bitscope jitter and nFET Miller plateau and Update for nFET Miller plateau I talked about using the Bitscope BS10 USB oscilloscope and post-processing to remove the trigger jitter to get a better trace of the Miller plateau when switching an AOI518 nFET.  I wasn’t entirely happy with that result, as I was using an external function generator (albeit a cheap Elenco FG500 box that puts out rather poor waveforms).  I thought I could do as well or better using a hysteresis oscillator to generate the square waves.

So I came up with the following circuit:

Test fixture for looking at the Miller plateau on the AOI518 nFET.

The top-left section, with the capacitors and the big inductor are just to keep the power supply clean. Because the power is coming from the 5V USB supply, passed through the Bitscope, any noise coupled back through the power supply can affect the readings, so I made sure that no high-frequency noise would be coupled back to the Bitscope that way.  One 4.7µF bypass capacitor (C6) is right next to the 74HC19N Vcc power pin on the breadboard and the other (C5) next to the emitter of the S9013 NPN transistor.  These helped in reducing ringing on the transitions of the square wave.

The Schmitt trigger U1 is the relaxation oscillator that oscillates at about 550kHz, and U2 buffers the output so that the load on the oscillator is constant.  R2 and C4 couple the output of the oscillator to the base of the NPN transistor Q2, which is configured as a common-emitter amplifier.

When Q2 is turned on, it sinks about 18.5mA of current (5V/270Ω), which at the nominal current gain of 120 for S9013 transistors, means about 150µA of base current. When Q2 is turned on it initially sinks even more current, discharging the gate  Q1 fast, but when Q2 is turned off, the gate is pulled up more gradually by the 270Ω resistor R1.  This gradual rise of the nFET gate voltage allows us to observe the Miller plateau when the nFET actually switches on.

The common-emitter amplifier using Q2 can switch very rapidly with no load, but adding the gate capacitance of Q1 makes the rise follow an RC charging curve. If the 150Ω load resistor R4 is omitted, the curve is smooth, as there is no voltage swing on the drain.  Putting in R4 results in the drain voltage dropping rapidly when Q1 turns on, which is coupled back to the gate through the Miller capacitance, resulting in the Miller plateau. These traces were gathered and dejittered separately (each is the average of over 500 traces).  The time alignment was done by hand, and may not be completely accurate.

The common-emitter amplifier using Q2 can switch very rapidly with no load, but adding the gate capacitance of Q1 makes the rise follow an RC charging curve. If the 150Ω load resistor R4 is omitted, the curve is smooth, as there is no voltage swing on the drain. Putting in R4 results in the drain voltage dropping rapidly when Q1 turns on, which is coupled back to the gate through the Miller capacitance, resulting in the Miller plateau.
These traces were gathered and dejittered separately (each is the average of over 500 traces). The time alignment was done by hand, and may not be completely accurate.

The initial rise in the drain voltage (from about -0.9 to -0.7 µs in the plot) is due to capacitive coupling of the rising gate voltage to the drain with the nFET off, and there is a similar overshoot at the lower end as the nFET is turned off (just before 0µs).

I played around quite a bit with the bias network R2 and C4 for the base of Q2. The resistor alone doesn’t work, as the base voltage remains a constant 340mV and the NPN transistor remains always on—I was a little confused by this, as the 340mV measurement on the Bitscope seemed too low to turn on an NPN transistor. I think that there is a calibration error on the Bitscope—according to my Kikusui COS5060 analog oscilloscope, the high voltage is about 600mV, which seems to be a more reasonable Vbe for a transistor that is on.

It seems that the offset that the Bitscope BS10 provides is inaccurate: I get a reading of 740mV for an offset of 2V, 1V, or 0V; 500mV with an offset of -1V; and 320mV with an offset of -2V or -3V.  Looking at the ground line with the same channel also shows an error for the -1V, -2V, -3V and -4V offsets (on the 11V range): -300mV for -1V, -560mV for -2V, -3V, and -4V. But those offsets are different from the ones I’m seeing with the oscillating base signal, so I suspect that it isn’t even a simple offset error.  This is bad—I’m going to have a hard time correcting such large and varying errors. I should probably ask the Bitscope technical staff whether large errors in the offsets are normal, or I have a damaged Bitscope BS10.  They’ve not made the schematic available, so I’m not sure what they are doing internally to provide the offset voltages.

The capacitor C4 alone also doesn’t work to bias the base, as the voltage on the base then doesn’t get high enough for  the NPN transistor to  turn on. With both the resistor R2 and the capacitor C4, the base swings about 5V, with the high value being the Vbe where the NPN transistor turns on. The resistor value is not critical—reducing R2 to 2kΩ moves the bottom end of the swing up a little, but seems to work just as well.  A very large resistor (100kΩ) seems to result in slow turn on for Q1.

The effect of changing C4 was not something I would have predicted—as I lower C4 (raising the corner frequency of the high-pass), I get a lot more ringing of the gate voltage, but faster transitions as well. I think that the faster transitions come from the base voltage not dropping as far below threshold when Q2 is off, so that it can rise above threshold sooner when Q2 needs to be turned on.

Smaller capacitors for C4 result in faster edges when turning on the NPN transistor, with more overshoot and ringing.  Once the capacitance is large enough, there is little further change.

Smaller capacitors for C4 result in faster edges when turning on the NPN transistor, with more overshoot and ringing. Once the capacitance is large enough, there is little further change.

The curves above were synchronized by the setting 0µs at the upward transition past 4.0V, which seems to overlay the dejittered waveforms fairly well. Over 900 traces were averaged for each of the 5 curves.

I could also provide a DC bias current for Q2 by removing R2 and connecting the base via a 10kΩ resistor to the clean +5V supply. That seems to work just as well, but moves up the lower end of the base voltage swing, which may result in slightly faster turn-on of the NPN transistor.

It’s nice that I can use the Bitscope (with dejittering) to produce the Miller plateau figure for the textbook, but I’m concerned about the erroneous offsets on the Bitscope.  I’m wondering what else I’ve been relying on that is miscalibrated.

1 Comment »

  1. […] loop limiting the slew rate of the output.  I’ve looked at that feedback loop before in More on nFET Miller plateau, for example, but the analysis here is slightly […]

    Pingback by Pullup vs. transimpedance amplifier | Gas station without pumps — 2015 July 5 @ 16:09 | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: