Gas station without pumps

2016 January 7

Counting pages

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 20:30
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I just read in Dan Graur’s blog, his post about how publishers report the sizes of his textbooks:

On the Numbering of Pages in Textbooks

American students are apparently afraid of books with too many pages. The solution that publishers have came up with to is to number different sections of the book separately.

Thus my previous book, the second edition of Fundamentals of Molecular Evolution was listed as xiv + 481 pp. That is, 14 pages of front material (title, acknowledgements, dedication) plus 481 pages of text. This was a significant increase in pages from the first edition, which was listed as xv + 284 pp.

My newest book, Molecular and Genome Evolution, which was published with the same publishing house, is listed as xvii + 612 pp + 54 LC + 34 I, in other words 17 pages of front material, 612 pages of text, 54 pages of references, and 34 pages of index. It seems that 612 is significantly less terrifying than 690 (or 707 if one includes everything in the book).  

Under this system, the current draft of my book is xxiv + 270 pp + 6 LC + 4 I—not counting the colophon, which is after the index.  Should the appendix have been in the 270 pp, where I put it, or in the “LC” count? Should the blank pages that exist only so that chapters start on a right-hand page be counted, as I did, or not?

Obviously, my book is much lighter weight than Prof. Graur’s (if weight means anything in an e-book-only publication), and I clearly need to beef up the index (though maybe not to four times the current length, which is what it would take to be comparable to his index/text ratio).

But 54 pages of references seems excessive for a textbook—even one with 612 content pages. No student is going to look up even 1% of those references. That depth of references is more appropriate for review article or a research monograph than for a textbook. Of course, many scientists don’t really distinguish between research monographs and textbooks, so perhaps it really is a research monograph, in which case the level of citation seems appropriate.

Perhaps Prof. Graur’s book, probably aimed at grad students or postdocs, is not typical of books aimed at college freshmen and sophomores. Looking at a textbook I happen to have on the floor by my desk, Matter and Interactions, which I haven’t put away since teaching/learning physics from it 3 years ago, I see xxiv + 1080 pp + 19 I, not counting the endpapers, which add another 3 pages of text (useful reference material).  This book seems to have no references—not at the end, not in each chapter, and not even occasional pointers to more information for curious readers. The indexing rate is 1.76%,which is only slightly more than my 1.48%, so I may not be as far off the mark in the amount of indexing I’ve done as I feared.

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