Gas station without pumps

2016 June 11

Teaching writing lab reports

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 09:24
Tags: , , ,

Greg Jacobs, in his post Jacobs Physics: Report from the AP reading: Teach your class to write concise laboratory procedures. Please., asks high-school physics teachers to teach students how to write concisely:

Part (a) of our question asks for a description of a laboratory procedure. It could be answered in 20 words: “Use a meterstick to measure the height of a dropped ball before and after it bounces. Repeat for multiple heights.

“But oh, no … when America’s physics students are asked to describe a procedure, they go all Better Homes and Gardens Cookery Manual on us. Folks, it’s not necessary to tell me to gather the materials, nor to remind me to first obtain a ball and a wall to throw it against. Nor do you have to tell me that I’m going to record all data in a lab notebook, nor that I’m going to do anything carefully or exactly. Just get to the point—what should I measure, and how should I measure it.

Please don’t underestimate the emotional impact on the exam reader of being confronted with a wall of text. We have to grade over a hundred thousand exams. When we turn the page and see dense writing through which we have to wade to find the important bits that earn points, we figuratively—sometimes literally, especially near 5:00 PM—hit ourselves in the forehead. Now, we’re professionals, and I know that we all take pride in grading each exam appropriately to the rubric. Nevertheless, don’t you think it’s worth making things easy for us, when we be nearing brain fatigue? Just as good businesspeople make it easy for customers to give them money, a good physics student makes it easy for the grader to award points. 

Don’t think I’m making fun of or whining about students here. Writing a wall of text where a couple of sentences would suffice is a learned behavior. The students taking the AP exam are merely writing the same kinds of procedures that they’ve been writing in their own physics classes. It is thus our collective responsibility as physics teachers to teach conciseness.

As I’ve been spending far too much time this week grading an 11-cm-thick stack of design reports from my applied electronics course, I have considerable sympathy with Greg Jacobs’s view.

Technical writing is all about the 4 Cs: clear, correct, concise, and complete. Although there is always some tension between clarity and correctness, and between completeness and being concise, I generally find pretty high correlations between the four properties. Often, the very long reports are muddled, incomprehensible bundles of improperly applied factoids, while the essential information is missing entirely.

Part of the reason I have such a huge stack of papers to grade at the end of the quarter is that I have been giving “redo” grades for any errors in non-redundant representations (like schematic diagrams), putting a very high premium on correctness. For the class-D amplifier lab, 80% of the class had to redo the reports, mostly because they had not gotten the orientation of the FET transistors right in the schematics (a serious error that could lead to fires in the amplifier). I must have done a worse job at explaining the FET symbols—several times—than I thought, or maybe it is one of those things that people don’t learn unless they make a mistake and have it pointed out to them, repeatedly. I’ll be trying to fix the book and the lectures next year to reduce this problem.

I’ve also been down-grading students for lack of clarity (especially when the writing seems to indicate a lack of understanding, and not just inability to communicate) and for leaving out essential material (like not providing the schematics for their preamplifier as part of their amplifier lab report, not providing the parameters of the models they fit, or not providing the models they used at all). So clarity and completeness have had a fairly big impact on grades.

But I have not been giving bonus points for being concise, which I probably should start doing, as some students have started using a kitchen-sink approach, throwing in anything that might be tangentially related to the subject. Unfortunately, these are the students most likely to have unclear and incorrect reports, and they leave out the essential material in an attempt to throw in useless background, so their attempts at completeness generally backfire. I need to discourage this behavior, undoubtedly learned in middle school and high school, and get them to focus on the stuff that is unique to their design, rather than telling me Ohm’s Law or the voltage-divider formula over and over.

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: