Gas station without pumps

2016 August 13

Transimpedance pulse monitor does need low-pass

Filed under: Circuits course,Data acquisition — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 18:16
Tags: , , ,

In More thoughts on log-transimpedance for pulse monitor lab, I wondered

I’m wondering now whether I can have students do a log-pulse monitor without bandpass filtering—just high-pass to get rid of the DC signal from overall illumination.  Given the new position of the lab in the course, as the second amplifier lab, I don’t really want to get too tricky with RC filtering.  The “gotcha” that was a problem before is that I had to remove short glitches in the very first stage, to avoid the bandpass filter lengthening them into things that looked like pulses—I don’t want students to have to do that sort of debugging on their second amplifier lab. If I can eliminate the hardware bandpass filters, and just have them use software ones, then the lab becomes more feasible.

I was also concerned that the Schottky 1N5817 diode I had tested did not have provide gain at low currents—the low threshold voltage for Schottky diodes is a disadvantage in this application. So this morning I wired up a log-transimpedance amplifier followed by a couple of op amps as inverting amplifiers.  I first tried a combined gain of 408 (which I had used before with an IR emitter as the transimpedance diode), then upped the gain to 4453. I used high-pass filters to block DC, but no low-pass filters.

The circuit was not functional without adding at least one low-pass filter (a 680nF capacitor in parallel with the diode), because the 60Hz interference saturated the amplifiers, and the smaller pulse signal was completely buried.

With the capacitor, the circuit worked fine in moderately high light, but the signal got weak in low light (due to the transimpedance amplifier having a max gain of about 35kΩ—the asymptotic equivalent resistance of the diode as current goes to 0).  With just the single capacitor for filtering, the 60Hz noise was larger than the pulse signal, but a digital filter could still recover the signal:

Notch filtering does a great job of removing the 60Hz noise from this signal sampled at 360Hz.

Notch filtering does a great job of removing the 60Hz noise from this signal sampled at 360Hz.

So it looks like I do have to have students do low-pass filtering for the pulse monitor. Can I fit that into the second amplifier lab, along with the log transimpedance, or will it all get too complicated?

2 Comments »

  1. […] Transimpedance pulse monitor does need low-pass, I realized that Schottky diodes were not going to work for the transimpedance amplifier, but I […]

    Pingback by Using nFET body diode for log-transimpedance | Gas station without pumps — 2016 August 15 @ 21:20 | Reply

  2. […] Transimpedance pulse monitor does need low-pass, I realized that Schottky diodes were not going to work well for the transimpedance amplifier, and […]

    Pingback by Using 4¢ diode for log-transimpedance | Gas station without pumps — 2016 August 20 @ 12:08 | Reply


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