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2016 December 15

Electret mic DC characterization with Analog Discovery 2

I tried one of the standard labs for the course, producing an I-vs-V plot for an electret microphone, using the Analog Discovery 2 function generator and oscilloscope, rather than a bench function generator and a Teensy board with PteroDAQ.

It was fairly easy to set up a 0–5V triangle wave, running at a very low frequency (50mHz, for a 20-second period).  The maximum output from the waveform generator is 5V, so setting the amplitude higher did not get larger voltages.  The signal was applied across the microphone in series with a sense resistor, and the voltage measured across the mic and across the sense resistor.

I ended up using two different sense resistors: one for measuring the current at high voltages, and one for measuring the current at low voltages, and I had to adjust the voltage scales on the two channels of the scope for the different ranges.  The results were fairly clean:

The low-voltage behavior of the nFET in the electret mic is not quite a linear resistor, and the saturation current definitely increases with voltage.

The low-voltage behavior of the nFET in the electret mic is not quite a linear resistor, and the saturation current definitely increases with voltage.

I tried extending the voltage range by using the power supply as well as the function generator: I set the function generator to a ±5V triangle wave, and used a -5V supply for the low-voltage reference. This worked well for the higher voltages, but the differential signal for the mic had an offset of about 12mV when the common-mode was -5V, which made the low-voltage measurements very wrong.  This offset may be correctable by recalibrating the scope (I am currently using the factory default settings, because I don’t have a voltmeter at home that I trust to be better than the factory settings), but I’m not counting on it.  When I need measurements of small signals, I’ll try to make sure that the common-mode is also small.

One other minor problem with the Analog Discovery 2: the female headers on the wires seem to have looser than usual springs, so that the wires easily fall off male header pins.  Given the stiffness of the wires, this is a bit

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