Gas station without pumps

2017 June 25

Fidget spinners revisited

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 17:55
Tags: , , ,

In Fidget spinners, I wrote about measuring and modeling the acceleration of two fidget spinners, 5-spoke spinner that cost $6.90 made from plastic and brass and a 3-bladed spinner that cost $8.90 milled out of brass:

The 5-spoked wheel spinner weighs 32.88±0.03g, and the 3-spoke brass spinner weighs 61.14±0.02g.

The previous post looked only at the fidget spinners spinning vertically (that is, with a horizontal axis), but I had noticed in playing with the spinners that they seemed to have different drag in different orientations, so I redid the measurements with the spinners horizontal (that is, with a vertical axis). I had a somewhat harder time spinning the spinners fast with them horizontally mounted, as my makeshift support for the photointerrupter was a bit precarious.

The 5-spoke wheel seemed to run smoothly , but the fit suggests more dry friction and less fluid friction.

The 3-spoke spinner really does not like to spin horizontally.

To visualize the physics better, I tried making acceleration vs. velocity plots for the fitted models:

When holding the wheel horizontally, there seems to be mainly dry friction, almost independent of the speed of the spin.

The 3-spoke spinner has much worse drag at all speeds when held horizontally rather than vertically. The fluid drag seems to be about the same as before, but there is much larger dry friction component (possibly from brass-on-brass contact between the spinner and the axle caps).

As expected from fidgeting with the spinners, the 3-blade spinner has much more drag than the wheel, both horizontally and vertically. The change from mainly wet friction to mainly dry friction for the wheel was unexpected, though.

Update 2017 Jun 25 21:15:  My wife just pointed me to a Wired article: https://www.wired.com/2017/05/the-phyiscs-of-fidget-spinners/ which does a poorer job of the same thing I did. They sampled at a fixed rate, rather than recording time stamps on each rising edge, so they had much poorer time resolution, and they assumed constant acceleration (dry friction), which is only appropriate for low-quality bearings.

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