Gas station without pumps

2019 August 19

Shakespeare cookies v5

On Saturday, my son and I baked shortbread cookies using version 5 of the Shakespeare cookie cutter:

The difference between version 4 and version 5 is mainly around the left eye (on the right in this photo). Version 4 had a lot of trouble with the dough getting stuck in the small regions there. (See prior post for cookies made with the V4 cutter.)

Despite the simplifications, Shakespeare’s head is still quite recognizable.

We used the classic recipe (2 cups flour, 1 cup butter, and ½ cup confectioner’s sugar), but this time I used pastry flour instead of a mixture of all-purpose flour and sweet rice flour.  The dough works about equally well either way.

The cookies came out good, but the cookie cutters are still having problems with dough sticking to the cutters. Chilling the dough after rolling helped a little, but stickiness was still a problem. We also had problems rolling the dough out to a uniform 6mm thickness—sometimes we had the dough too thin, and the interior lines were not clear, and sometimes we had it too thick and couldn’t get the cookie out of the cutter without destroying the cookie.

My son had two suggestions, both of which I’ll follow up on:

  • Go back to having separate cutter and stamp (as in Version 3), but don’t try to connect the two.  Make the stamp just have a few alignment marks so that it can be hand-aligned to the cookie outline.  The stamp can have a lot of open space, so that the visual alignment is relatively easy, and so that the cookie dough can be easily separated from the stamp.  The stamping can even be done after the cookie has been transferred to the baking sheet, to make distortion from moving the cookie less of a problem.
  • Make a set of 6mm thick sticks that can be put down around the dough, that the rolling pin can rest on.

Version 6 of the stamp failed, because I made the alignment markers too thin and they did not survive even gentle handling.  I’m now printing Version 7, which has more robust alignment markers.

 

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