Gas station without pumps

2019 August 31

Shakespeare cookies v7

Today (2019 August 31), my son and I baked shortbread cookies using version 7 of the Shakespeare cookie cutter, which is a two-part design with a separate cutter and stamp:

Version 7 of the Shakespeare cookie cutter uses a simple outline for the cutter and a separate stamp for adding the facial features. Version 6 of the stamp failed, because I made the alignment markers too thin and they did not survive even gentle handling.

In addition to the new cutter and stamp, we also tried out the “cookie sticks” that I made for rolling the dough to a consistent 6mm thickness:

I made two different sticks: a straight one and one with a 90° corner. The OpenSCAD file also allows other angles, so I could have made 120° corners for a hexagon.  I made the sticks about as big as I could print on the Monoprice Delta Mini.

The hooks at the two end of the stick lock the sticks together.

I made enough of the sticks to make a rectangular frame almost as big as my cookie sheets. I ran out of the ugly green PLA filament after only 3 sticks, so I did the rest in the Hatchbox gold PLA filament.

I made the same shortbread dough as last time: 1 cup butter, 2 cups pastry flour, and ½ cup powdered sugar. I cleared a counter to make some workspace:

I had a cookie sheet,a rolling pin (a piece of birch dowel that I sanded and coated with mineral oil decades ago), a silicone baking mat, the cookie sticks, the cookie cutter and stamp, and a shallow bowl for flour.

The entire batch fills about 2/3 of the frame when rolled out:

For the first batch, we tried rolling the dough directly on the silicone baking mat, and removing the excess dough without moving the cookies.

The cookie sticks worked well for getting a uniform, consistent thickness to the dough, and 6mm is about the right thickness for these cookies. Having a complete frame around the dough meant that I did not have to worry about the cookie sticks shifting position, nor what the orientation of the rolling pin was.

The stamping is easily done on the cookies, but removing the excess dough from between the cookies was harder than we expected. It probably didn’t help that it was a warm afternoon and the dough got sticky quickly, even though we refrigerated it before rolling.

For the second rolling, we rolled the dough onto waxed paper, then transferred the cut-out cookies to a baking sheet lined with a silicone mat, doing the stamping only after the cookies were on the baking sheet.

We ended up with 19 cookies from the batch, and they came out pretty good:

This picture is a bit misleading as these were probably the best two of the nineteen.

The biggest problem was with dough getting stuck in the nose when stamping—it might be easier to do Tycho Brahe cookie cutters!

The second biggest problem was getting accurate alignment of the stamp with the cutter. For several of the cutters we were a millimeter off, resulting in an extraneous line at one of the alignment markers.

Despite these minor problems, the v7 cutters were much easier to use than previous versions, and I don’t have any immediate ideas for improvements (other than changing from a 3D-printed cutter to a injection-molded cutter, which would require a lot of changes and cost a few thousand dollars—something I’m not prepared for.

2 Comments »

  1. […] a circle about 2½ inches in diameter, but no thinner than ¼” thick. (Maybe I can use my cookie sticks!) Pinch the outer edges to be a little […]

    Pingback by Red bean paste buns | Gas station without pumps — 2020 April 24 @ 12:17 | Reply

  2. […] 11 months ago (for the Santa Cruz Shakespeare trip to the Ashland Shakespeare Festival), using version 7 of the cookie cutters I […]

    Pingback by Shakespeare cookies (whole wheat) | Gas station without pumps — 2020 September 3 @ 17:28 | Reply


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