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2017 April 10

Electret microphone hysteresis

Filed under: Circuits course,Data acquisition — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 09:05
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In attempting to determine the I-vs-V characteristics of an electret microphone, I stumbled across a phenomenon that I’m still having difficulty explaining.  What I was looking for was a plot like this one:

I-vs-V DC characteristics for an electret microphone. The linear and saturation regions are nicely distinguished and there is little noise.

In previous years I had collected the data with PteroDAQ, but this plot was done with my Analog Discovery 2, which combines both the function generator and the data acquisition. Because I was in a bit of a hurry, the first time I tried doing the characterization, I used a shorter period for the function generator, and got a somewhat different plot:

The hysteresis observed here was unexpected. The loop is traced clockwise, with the upper curve for increasing voltage and the lower curve for decreasing voltage.

At first I thought that the effect was a thermal one, like I saw when characterizing power MOSFETs, but a thermal phenomenon would get more pronounced at slower sweep rates (more time to heat up and cool down), while the hysteresis here could be reduced by sweeping very slowly. Also, the hysteresis did not rely on running large currents—the mic was dissipating less than 1mW at the most, and changing the voltage range did not change the hysteresis much.

My next conjecture was a capacitive effect, which I tentatively confirmed by either adding a capacitor in parallel with mic (increasing the hysteresis) or a capacitor in parallel with the 5.1kΩ sense resistor (which reduced the hysteresis or even reversed it).

I tried playing with the frequency of the excitation waveform, to see what happened to the hysteresis:

This pretty plot shows the transition from nearly DC (the curve that looks like the first one of the post) to something that looks almost like a resistor, with current going up linearly with voltage, as the frequency is increased.

Because the hysteresis did not seem to depend on the amount of the sweep, I picked a voltage well into the saturation region (4V), and tried doing a Bode plot of impedance for the mic for a relatively small signal (±1V). I then fit the Bode plot with an (R1+C)||R2 model:

The parallel resistor corresponds to the slope of the DC I-vs-V curve around a bias of 4V. The model fits the data so well that the curve for the data is hidden by the model curve.

I also tried a Bode plot for a DC offset of 2V and an amplitude of ±300mV:

Like with the 4V DC bias, I got an extremely good fit with the (R1+C)||R2 model. The parallel resistance is different, because the slope of the I-vs-V plot is a little higher (so smaller resistance) at 2V than at 4V.

Because the network tool in WaveForms 2015 provides phase information as well as magnitude information, I did my fit first on magnitude, then on phase. The phase fitting was also extremely good:

I show only the 2V phase plot here—the 4V one is similar, though the biggest phase shift is -56.5° at 3.5V, rather than -45.1° at 4.6 Hz.

So I have an excellent electrical model of the behavior of the electret mic at a couple of different bias voltages, with a simple explanation for one of the parameters of the model. I’m still mystified where the capacitance (about 1.7µF) and the other resistance (about 8kΩ) come from. I suppose, theoretically, that they could be tiny surface mount components inside the can of the mic, but I see no reason for the manufacturer to go to the trouble and expense of doing that. The pictures of a disassembled mic at http://www.openmusiclabs.com/learning/sensors/electret-microphones/ suggest a rather low-tech, price-sensitive manufacturing process.

Incidentally, until I looked at those pictures, I had a rather different mental model of how the electret mic was assembled, envisioning one with a simple membrane and the electret on the gate of a MOSFET. It seems that the electret is put on the surface of the membrane and a jFET is used rather than a MOSFET. After thinking about it for a while, I believe that a jFET is used in order to take advantage of the slight leakage current to the gate—the gate will be properly biased as a result of the leakage. The OpenMusicLabs post showed a 2SK596 jFET (an obsolete part), which has an input resistance of only 25—35MΩ, easily low enough to provide bias due to leakage currents. If the gate is biased to be about 0V relative to the source, then the jFET is on by default,

The 1.7µF capacitance is huge—many orders of magnitude larger than I could explain by a Miller effect (unless I’ve screwed up my computations totally) as all the capacitances for the jFET are in the pF range, and the multiplier for the Miller effect should only be around 5–50 (1–10mS times the 5.1kΩ load), so I’m still at a loss to explain the hysteresis. I checked to see whether the effect was something in my test setup, by replacing the mic with a 10kΩ resistor, but it behaved like a 10kΩ resistor across the full range of frequencies that I used for testing the mic—this is not some weird artifact of the test setup, but a phenomenon of the microphone (and probably just of the jFET in the mic).

I suppose I should buy a jFET (maybe a J113, that has a 2mA saturation current with a 0V Vgs) to see if other jFETS have similar properties, connecting the gate to the source with a small capacitor to imitate the electret biasing.

Incidentally, while doing this experimenting, I found a bug in the Waveforms 2015 code: if you sweep the frequencies downward in the network analyzer (which works), on output to a file the frequencies are misreported (as if they had been swept upward). I reported this on the Digilent Forum, and they claim it will be fixed in the next release. The time between the report and the acknowledgement was only a few hours, which is one of the fastest responses I’ve seen for a software bug report. (They didn’t say when the next release will be, but they’ve had several since I bought my Analog Discovery 2 four months ago, so they seem to be releasing bug fix versions rapidly.)

2017 February 6

Hysteresis oscillator is voltage-dependent

Filed under: Circuits course,Data acquisition — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 20:42
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Today in class I did a demo where I tested the dependence of the frequency of my relaxation oscillator board on the power supply voltage.

The demo I did in class had to be debugged on the fly (it turns out that if you configure the power supplies of the Analog Discovery 2 to be low-speed waveform channels, then you can’t set them with the “Supplies” tool, but there is no warning that you can’t when you do the setting), but otherwise went well.

One surprising result (i.e., something else that hadn’t happened when I tested the demo at home on Sunday) was that the frequency appeared to go up instead of down when I touched the capacitive touch sensor.  This I managed to quickly debug by changing my sampling rate to 600Hz, and observing that the 60Hz frequency modulation was extreme at the podium, taking the oscillation frequency from 0Hz to 3MHz on each cycle.  Grounding myself against the laptop removed this interference and produced the smooth expected signal.

Anyway, when I got home I was much too tired to grade the lab reports turned in today (I’ve got a cold that is wiping me out), so after a nap and dinner, I decided to make a clean plot of frequency vs. power-supply voltage for my relaxation oscillator.  I stuck the board into a breadboard, with no touch sensor, so that the capacitance would be fairly stable and not too much 60Hz interference would be picked up.  I powered the board from the Analog Discovery 2 power supply, sweeping the voltage from 0V to 5V (triangle wave, 50mHz, for a 20-second period).

I used the Teensy LC board with PteroDAQ to record both the frequency of the output and the voltage of the power supply.  To protect the Teensy board inputs, I used a 74AC04 inverter with 3.3V power to buffer the output of the hysteresis board, and I used a voltage divider made of two 180kΩ resistors to divide the power-supply voltage in half.

When I recorded a few cycles of the triangle waveform, using 1/60-second counting times for the frequency measurements, I got a clean plot:

At low voltages, the oscillator doesn't oscillate. The frequency then goes up with voltage, but peaks around 4.2V, then drops again at higher voltages.

At low voltages, the oscillator doesn’t oscillate. The frequency then goes up with voltage, but peaks around 4.2V, then drops again at higher voltages.

I expected the loss of oscillation at low voltage, but I did not expect the oscillator to be so sensitive to power-supply voltage, and I certainly did not expect it to be non-monotone.  I need to heed my class motto (“Try it and see!”) more often.

Sampling at a higher frequency reveals that the hysteresis oscillator is far from holding a steady frequency:

Using 1/600 second counting intervals for the frequency counter reveals substantial modulation of the frequency.

Using 1/600 second counting intervals for the frequency counter reveals substantial modulation of the frequency.

This plot of frequency vs. time shows the pattern of frequency modulation, which varies substantially as the voltage changes, but seems to be repeatable for a given voltage. (One period of the triangle wave is shown.)

This plot of frequency vs. time shows the pattern of frequency modulation, which varies substantially as the voltage changes, but seems to be repeatable for a given voltage. (One period of the triangle wave is shown.)

Zooming in on a region where the frequency modulation is large, we can see that there are components of both 60Hz and 120Hz.

Zooming in on a region where the frequency modulation is large, we can see that there are components of both 60Hz and 120Hz.

I could reduce the 60Hz interference a lot by using a larger C and smaller R for the RC time constant. That would make the touch sensor less sensitive (since the change in capacitance due to touching would be the same, but would be a much smaller fraction of the total capacitance). The sensor is currently excessively sensitive, though, so this might be a good idea anyway.

2015 April 27

Ideas for improving hysteresis lab

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 08:38
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The hysteresis lab was the least successful one so far this year.  Students got the designs done and built, but they learned less than they could have from the lab (too much copying of “answers” without understanding) and the lab took too long for the time allotted.

I’m considering going back to a 2-day hysteresis lab, but expanding the lab slightly to include using an nFET to control a loudspeaker (probably with a series resistor to limit current to 500mA). Adding the nFET as a low-side switch would be a useful thing for them to know about (it is a standard arrangement for controlling heating elements, solenoids, and other devices in lab equipment), and would prepare them better for the class-D power-amp lab.

The problem here is that a good oscillation frequency for a touch sensor uses a small capacitor (hence a high frequency), while a good oscillation frequency for the loudspeaker is much lower (200Hz–4kHz).  I can have them add an external capacitor (resulting in little or no touch sensitivity) when driving the loudspeaker, or I can have them build two oscillators: a high-frequency one and a low-frequency one.

I’d want to redesign the board they solder the hysteresis oscillator on to make room for the nFET and loudspeaker connections,  plus giving them more holes for connecting up unused pins on the 74HC14N chip.  This will probably make the board bigger than 2.5cm×5cm, raising the price by 50¢.  They’d need an extra nFET in their kits (another 40¢) and perhaps another screw terminal (80¢).  An extra buck or two for the parts is no big deal, as the lab fee is already larger than what the students are getting, though the extra cost for having to use UC-approved vendors may be eating up most of the “excess” fees.

The lab could be split between the breadboard and the soldering phases, with students who are behind still completing the breadboarding in the second lab.

One question I’ve not resolved is how to reschedule the labs so that there is room for a 2-day hysteresis lab.  Is there any lab that currently takes 2 days that can be squished to 1 day (with less damage than squishing the hysteresis lab)?  How do I keep the reports on schedule so that I can grade over the weekend?

2015 April 26

Comments for class after grading

Friday’s lecture went fairly well.

There were a few questions at the beginning of class, one of which lent itself well to my talking about choosing different models for the same phenomenon and using the simplest model that worked for the design being done.  In this case it was about the relaxation oscillator using a 74HC14N Schmitt trigger and where the constraints on the feedback resistor came from.  I told them about some more detailed models we could do of the Schmitt trigger, including input capacitance (max value on the data sheet), input leakage current (not specified, but probably fairly small, under 1µA), and output resistance (which would get added to the feedback resistance).  I’ll have to incorporate some of those ideas into the book, when I rewrite those chapters this summer—the hysteresis lab needs the most rework of anything so far this quarter.

After the questions I mainly talked about polarizable and non-polarizable electrodes developing the R +  (R||C) + half-cell model of an electrode that they will be fitting (without the half cell) in labs this week.

This weekend’s grading was a bit painful, and I’m probably going to have to spend all of Monday’s lecture filling in gaps in their prior education that I had not anticipated.  Some holes also became apparent from e-mail questions I got from students over the weekend.

I’ll try to gather the common problems here, so that I can use the list as lecture notes tomorrow.

  • There were a lot of REDO grades for errors on schematics.  I hate giving REDO (since it doubles my grading load), but I told students at the beginning of the quarter that any error on the schematics was an automatic REDO.  I plan to stick to that, despite the pain for both me and the students, because they have to develop the habit of double and triple checking their non-redundant documents (schematics, PCR primers, …).  Sloppy documentation is a serious problem in engineering and too many faculty and graders have been perpetuating the myth that the almost right idea is good enough.  I’m particularly harsh on students who change kHz into Hz or pF into nF.  Off-by-a-factor-of-1000 is not good enough!  The most extreme case so far is someone who specified a capacitor as being in the gigafarads (they’d typed 109 instead of 10-9). A factor of 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 off is not the sort of thing one can ignore.  I also get annoyed by students who randomly pick a unit (H when they need Ω, or Ω when they need Hz), as if all units were just decorations to please a teacher, with no real meaning to them
  • Frequency is 1/period.  For the relaxation oscillator, they do two charge/discharge calculations to get the period as a multiple of RC (though many blindly copied one of the formulas for just the charge time without understanding it, and assumed it was the period). But even after computing the charging time students blindly used  2πf = 1/(RC) as a magic incantation.  That formula was relevant for the corner frequency of RC filters, but has nothing to do with the oscillation frequency of the relaxation oscillator.
  • The capacitance calculation being done in the prelab was for the capacitance of a finger touch to the touch plate, but a lot of students claimed that it was the calculation to determine the size of the ceramic capacitor.  Only a couple of groups bothered to explain the connection between the two capacitances. I think I need to rewrite the prompts in the book to force the values to be more different, so that students have to think which capacitance they are talking about.
  • I find that students often talk about “the voltage” or “the capacitance” as if there was only one in their circuit, and when asked which one they are talking about are completely mystified—to them invoking the magic word is all that can be expected of them—actually knowing what it refers to is unreasonable.
  • Students in general were doing too much ritual magic. They would put down a formula they thought was relevant (often copying it incorrectly), then claim that from that formula they got some number for their design.  Often the formula was not relevant, or additional assumptions needed to be made (like choosing arbitrary values for some variables).  At the very least, there was some substantial algebra to be done to convert the formula into a usable form.  Some students claimed that Wolfram alpha gave them the solution (when there was not enough information to solve for the variable they wanted a value for).  Basically, I’m a bit angry at the students for trying to bullshit their way through the assignment. One pair of students said quite honestly that they did not know how to do a computation and got the value they used from the students at the next bench.  I gave them bonus points, and I’ll help them figure out how to do the computation they were having trouble with—I have no problems with students not knowing how to do something new and somewhat tricky, but I do have trouble with students deliberately looking dishonest and stupid by writing bullshit.
  • The computation that the honest students had trouble with is one that many students had trouble with, so I’ll go over it in class.  I gave the students a derivation of a formula for the charging time of the capacitor in the relaxation oscillator, but I didn’t have time to step them through the derivation.  It seems like most of the class can’t read math, since many just copied the final formula without reading the text that said it was the time to charge the capacitor.  There was an exercise immediately afterwards asking students to compute the time to discharge the capacitor, but this exercise was added to the book after the students had done their prelab exercises, so they didn’t bother to look at the exercise. What they needed to do for the lab was to add the charge and discharge times (which are not quite the same) to get the period.
  • I need to remind the students that they are turning in design reports, not lab reports.  I’m not looking for fill-in-the-blank worksheets, but descriptions of how they designed and tested their circuits.  Omitting the design steps is omitting the most important part of the report!
  • I gave the students three models to fit to the data, and showed them how to do the fits for two of the models in Wednesday’s lecture.  There wasn’t time to get to the third model, so I just told them to use the same technique as the second model, but with the different formula.  Most of the class never bothered to fit the third model (the only one that really fits the data well)—if I didn’t do all the work for them in lecture, then they weren’t going to generalize even a tiny bit to do it themselves.
  • A lot of students did not do a good job of fitting the models, because they fit the data with linear scaling, rather than with log scaling as I had shown them.  This is a fairly subtle point (errors on a linear y axis are differences, but on a log y axis are ratios), so I’ll review it in class.
  • I  think that some students don’t have any idea when one would use a log-log plot, a log-linear plot, a linear-log plot, or a linear-linear plot.  I thought that was covered in precalculus, but I guess not. So tomorrow I’ll present the idea that the only curve most people understand visually is a straight line, so one wants to choose axis scaling so that the expected relationship is a straight line.  Linear plots are for linear (or affine) models, log-log plots are for power laws, log-linear are for exponentials, and linear-log are for logarithmic relationships.  I’ll put a general straight line on each and derive the form of the function that matches that straight line.
  • The purpose of the Tuesday lab was to collect data and model the loudspeaker with a few parameters.  But many students neglected to report those parameters in their design reports!  They produced a plot and fitted models to it, but nowhere on the plot, in the figure caption, or in the main body (in decreasing order of usefulness) did they report what the parameter values were that the fit produced.  For students who are so focussed on answer getting that they neglect to explain how they came up with their answers, this seems like a strange omission.
  • For the Thursday lab, no one did back calculations from their observed frequencies to estimate the capacitance of the 74HC14N input, of the untouched touch plate, or even of the touch itself, to see whether their observations were consistent with their design predictions. One group of students claimed to have done sanity checks, but I don’t believe them, as they also reported oscillations around 20Hz, instead of 20kHz.
  • For the prelab, it seems that a lot of students computed R + \omega L instead of | R + j \omega L|, though most got it right in the gnuplot scripts for the lab itself.  I have to remind students that |A+B| \neq |A|+|B|.
  • On the typesetting front, I’m making some progress on getting students to put their plots in as figures with captions, though way too many are still referring to “the plot below” rather than to “Figure 3”.  I’m also having some difficulty getting them to be sure to refer to all the figures in the main body text.  A lot of times they’ll toss in a handful of plots with no reference to them at all.
  • On the opposite side of the coin, I have to teach them that equations are properly part of a sentence, generally as a noun phrase, and are not standalone sentences.  When there is an explanation of variables after a formula (“where A is this, and B is that”), the where-clauses are still part of the same sentence.
  • Some other little things to tell them:
    • The word “significant” should be reserved for its technical meaning of “statistical significance”—very unlikely to have occurred by chance according to the specified null model. It should not be used in the normal English way to mean “big”, “important”, or “something I like”.
    • To get gnuplot to produce smooth curves when there are sharp changes in function, it is necessary to do set samples 3000 to compute the function at more points than the small default number.
    • Students have been misusing the word “shunt” for any resistor. Properly, it is a low resistance used to divert current from some other part of the circuit—in our designs, it is the resistor being used to sense current and change it into voltage. I wonder if I should switch terms and talk about a “sense” resistor, though “shunt” is the standard term for ammeters.
    • A minor pet peeve of mine: I hate the word “utilize”. I have yet to see a context in which “use” does not do the same job better.

2015 April 23

Very long couple of days

Yesterday and today have been draining.

Yesterday, I had three classes each 70 minutes long: banana slug genomics, applied electronics for bioengineers, and a guest lecture for another class on protein structure.  I also had my usual 2 hours of office hours, delayed by half an hour because of the guest lecture.

The banana-slug-genomics class is going well.  My co-instructor (Ed Green) has done most of the organizing and has either arranged guest lectures or taught classes himself. This week and part of next we are getting preliminary reports from the 5 student groups on how the assemblies are coming.  No one has done an assembly yet, but there has been a fair amount of data cleanup and prep work (adapter removal, error correction, and estimates of what kmer sizes will work best in the de Bruijn graphs for assembly).  The data is quite clean, and we have about 23-fold coverage currently, which is just a little low for making good contigs.   (See https://banana-slug.soe.ucsc.edu/data_overview for more info about the data.) Most of the data is from a couple of lanes of HiSeq sequencing (2×100 bp) from 2 libraries (insert sizes around 370 and 600) , but some is from an early MySeq run (2×300bp), used to confirm that the libraries were good before the HiSeq run.  In class, we decided to seek a NextSeq run (2×250bp), either with the same libraries or with a new one, so that we could get more data quickly (we can get the data by next week, rather than waiting 2 or 3 weeks for a HiSeq run to piggyback on).  With the new data, we’ll have more than enough shotgun data for making the contigs.  The mate-pair libraries for scaffolding are still not ready (they’ve been failing quality checks and need to be redone), or we would run one of them on the NextSeq run.  We’ll probably also do a transcriptome library (in part to check quality of scaffolding, and in part to annotate the genome), and possibly a small-RNA library (a UCSC special interest).

The applied electronics lecture had a lot to cover, because the material on hysteresis that was not covered on Monday needed to be done before today’s lab, plus I had to show students how to interpret the 74HC15N datasheet for the Schmitt trigger, as we run them at 3.3V, but specs are only given for 2V, 4.5V, and 6V.  I also had to explain how the relaxation oscillator works (see last year’s blog post for the circuit they are using for the capacitance touch sensor).

Before getting to all the stuff on hysteresis, I had to finish up the data analysis for Tuesday’s lab, showing them how to fit models to the measured magnitude of impedance of the loudspeakers using gnuplot.  The fitting is fairly tricky, as the resistor has to be fit in one part of the curve, the inductor in another, and the RLC parameters for the resonance peak in yet another.  Furthermore, the radius of convergence is pretty small for the RLC parameters, so we had to do a lot of guessing reasonable values and seeing if we got convergence.  (See my post of 2 years ago for models that worked for measurements I made then.)

After the overstuffed electronics lecture, I had to move to the next classroom over and give a guest lecture on protein structure.  For this lecture I did some stuff on the chalk board, but mostly worked with 3D Darling models. When I did the guest lecture last year, I prepared a bunch of PDB files of protein structures to show the class, but I didn’t have the time or energy for that this year, so decided to do it all with the physical models.  I told students that the Darling models (which are the best kits I’ve seen for studying protein structure) are available for check out at the library, and that I had instructions for building protein chains with the Darling models plus homework in Spring 2011 with suggestions of things to build.  The protein structure lecture went fairly well, but I’m not sure how much students learned from it (as opposed to just being entertained).  The real learning comes from building the models oneself, but I did not have the luxury of making assignments for the course—nor would I have had time to grade them.

Speaking of grading, right after my 2 hours of office hours (full, as usual, with students wanting waivers for requirements that they had somehow neglected to fulfill), I had a stack of prelab assignments to grade for the hysteresis lab.  The results were not very encouraging, so I rewrote a section of my book to try to clarify the points that gave the students the most difficulty, adding in some scaffolding that I had thought would be unnecessary.  I’ve got too many students who can’t read something (like the derivation of the oscillation frequency for a relaxation oscillator on Wikipedia) and apply the same reasoning to their slightly different relaxation oscillator.  All they could do was copy the equations (which did not quite apply).  I put the updated book on the web site at about 11:30 p.m., emailed the students about it, ordered some more inductors for the power-amp lab, made my lunch for today, and crashed.

This morning, I got up around 6:30 a.m. (as I’ve been doing all quarter, though I am emphatically not a morning person), to make a thermos of tea, and process my half-day’s backlog of email (I get 50–100 messages a day, many of them needing immediate attention). I cycled up to work in time to open the lab at 10 a.m., then was there supervising students until after 7:30 pm. I had sort of expected that this time, as I knew that this lab was a long one (see Hysteresis lab too long from last year, and that was when the hysteresis lab was a two-day lab, not just one day).  Still, it made for a very long day.

I probably should be grading redone assignments today (I have a pile that were turned in Monday), but I don’t have the mental energy needed for grading tonight.  Tomorrow will be busy again, as I have banana-slug genomics, a visiting collaborator from UW, the electronics lecture (which needs to be about electrodes, and I’m not an expert on electrochemistry), and the grad research symposium all afternoon. I’ll also be getting another stack of design reports (14 of them, about 5 pages each) for this week’s lab, to fill up my weekend with grading. Plus I need to update a couple more chapters of the book before students get to them.

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