Gas station without pumps

2020 September 25

Rye bread rolls again

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 19:11
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I managed to resurrect my sourdough starter by adding more yeast and keeping it in the refrigerator for a week, and I made a whole-wheat sourdough bread that came out pretty good (good crust and crumb, but not sour enough for my taste). It was basically the same ingredients and amounts as bread-machine bread, except for starting with sourdough starter for part of the liquid, bread flour, and yeast, and substituting molasses for the sugar.  I also baked it on baking parchment (no loaf pan) for the first half of the baking time, then directly on the terracotta tiles for the second half.

The whole-wheat sourdough looked good, as well as tasting pretty good.

So this week I decided to do the rye bread rolls again—the recipe that originated my sourdough.  Now that I have a starter, the recipe is a little different:

Feed starter:

1 cup sourdough starter
½ cup warm water (105°–115°F)
½ cup Strauss yogurt (the sourest one in our local market)
1 cup rye flour

Mix together in bowl, cover with wet dish towel, and let sit at room temperature for a day.  Remove and refrigerate one cup of the mixture for future sourdough starter, and let the rest sit for a day or two more at room temperature.

Dough:

the aged sourdough starter
1¼ cup warm water (105°–115°F)
1 teaspoon yeast
1 tablespoon salt
1½ cup bread flour
3 cups rye flour
1½ cup raisins

Stir down the starter, blend in water, yeast and salt. Let sit for 3–4 minutes so yeast can dissolve.

Stir in bread flour.  Add rye flour a cup at a time until dough forms a mass.  Stir with silicone scraper until dough has lost most of its stickiness.  Stir in raisins (this is different from last time, when I didn’t add the raisins until just before shaping). Turn from the bowl onto floured surface.

Knead on well-floured surface until dough soft and elastic (about 6 minutes), adding about ¼ cup rye flour to keep dough from sticking.  May need to scrape surface initially, as dough starts out very sticky. Put in greased bowl, cover, and let rise for 1–2 hours.

Punch down, divide dough into 2-oz pieces, and roll into balls.  Place on baking parchment on baking sheets, cover, and let rise until double in size (about one hour). Makes 24 rolls.

Glaze:

1 egg yolk
1 tablespoon milk

Remove cover, brush each roll with glaze, and cut X into top of each roll. Bake in preheated 400°F oven for 35–40 minutes.  Done when browned on the bottom and feel solid when pinched.

Cool on wire rack.

The rye rolls came out looking good. They had a nice flavor and texture, but not as much sourness as I would like. I think I also need to cut the crosses deeper.

2020 May 19

Rye bread rolls

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 23:50
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I decided that this week’s bread would be a rye bread, so I looked through Bernard Clayton’s The Breads of France and Joe Ortiz’s The Village Baker, but I didn’t find a recipe that I wanted to follow exactly.  So I’m making up my own, based on a combination of recipes.  I decided to do the recipe for La Tourte de Seigle in The Breads of France with a 3-day starter, but using some yogurt in the starter (sort of like the goat’s milk in the Jewish Rye recipe from The Village Baker).  I’ll also add raisins and shape the dough into rolls like Les Benoîtons from The Breads of France.

Starter:

½ cup warm water (105°–115°F)
¼ cup yogurt
1 teaspoon yeast
pinch salt
1 cup rye flour

Mix together in bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let sit at room temperature for 1–3 days.

Dough:

all the starter (I’ll save a bit for a sourdough starter for next week)
1½ cup warm water (105°–115°F)
2 teaspoons yeast
1 tablespoon salt
1½ cup bread flour (original recipe has all-purpose flour, but I think the extra gluten will help)
3 cups rye flour
1½ cup raisins

Stir down the starter, blend in water, yeast and salt. Let sit for 3–4 minutes so yeast can dissolve.

Stir in bread flour.  Add rye flour a cup at a time until dough forms a mass.  Stir with wooden spoon or silicone scraper until dough has lost most of its stickiness and can be turned from the bowl onto floured surface.

Knead slowly until dough soft and elastic (about 6 minutes).  May need to start work with pastry scraper initially, as dough starts out very sticky.  Dust occasionally with bread flour to control stickiness. Put in greased bowl, cover, and let rise for 40–60 minutes.

Soak raisins for 10 minutes, then pat dry.

Punch down and flatten dough and spread raisins on top. Fold dough and knead until raisins well distributed.

Divide dough into 2-oz pieces and roll into balls.  Place on baking parchment on baking sheets, cover, and let rise until double in size (about one hour).

Glaze:

1 egg yolk
1 tablespoon milk

Remove cover, brush each roll with glaze, and cut X into top of each roll. Bake in preheated 400°F oven for 30–35 minutes, turning baking sheet at 15 minutes for more uniform baking.  Done when browned on the bottom and feel solid when pinched.

Cool on wire rack.

Update 2020 May 22: The rye sour smelled rather nasty (as might be expected for dairy products souring for 3 days), but the rolls came out well.  The dough is very sticky, so shaping the rolls required some practice and a lot of flour on the hands.  The recipe makes about 30 rolls.

Rye rolls cooling on the wire rack.

Rye rolls on a plate, with a pot of green tea for the bread-and-tea event.

 

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