Gas station without pumps

2017 July 15

More recent theater events

I haven’t been posting about theater I’ve seen since the post Recent theater events, which was back in April.  Here is a list of things we’ve seen since then:

Date title produced by
2017 May 13 Great Expectations WEST performing arts
2017 May 19 Avenue Q Santa Cruz High School
2017 May 20 Sylvia Jewel Theatre
2017 June 3 Zoot Suit UCSC Theater Department
2017 June 5 Two Gentlemen of Verona UCSC Shakes To Go
2017 June 10–11 Midsummer Night’s Dream UCSB Shakespeare in the Park
2017 June 17 Merry Wives of Windsor Silicon Valley Shakespeare
2017 July 14 The 39 Steps Santa Cruz Shakespeare

The WEST teen production for the spring, Great Expectations, was fairly well done, though there were a few actors who were too quiet, even in the small Broadway Playhouse.  The teen productions have a mix of first-time-on-stage actors and experienced ones, so can be a bit hit-and-miss.  Their WEST Esemble players are their more experienced teen troupe—I did not get to see their production this Spring, though my wife did—they had an adaptation of Robin Hood that they performed at some local schools, including the one where my wife is the librarian.

The Santa Cruz High production of Avenue Q was good—we went because it included an actress who has also performed (at WEST) with our son (she’s also the daughter of one of my former students—we found out that she was in the Avenue Q production when we ran into her and her father at a local eatery).  The biggest problem with the Avenue Q production was that the singers were miked, but the mikes did not work consistently. I’m not a big fan of musicals, but Avenue Q seemed better written than most.

The next evening after Avenue Q we went to see Sylvia by the Jewel Theatre. The acting and production were good, but the script was rather weak material, so the production as a whole was not very satisfying.  It was quite a contrast to Avenue Q the night before, which had much weaker production values but better material. It showed that even a professional production can’t rescue a weak script.

Zoot Suit at UCSC was an amazing production, combining first-rate acting, superb costuming, and a first-rate script. The script was updated by the author (Luis Valdez) last year for a production in Los Angeles, and this production was directed by his son, Kinan Valdez. Because Luis Valdez is a local author, he attended the performance the same night we were there and was available after the show for Q&A (we did not stay for that, because we needed to catch a bus home). This was probably the best student production I’ve seen, at UCSC or elsewhere.

My wife and I saw the Shakes to Go production of Two Gentlemen of Verona at the elementary school where my wife works, as I was unable to get to any of the performances that they did on the UCSC campus. As always, the Shakes to Go production was fast-paced and simplified for school children to be able to follow, but well done within the constraints of a production that has to be finished in 50 minutes and needs to be portable enough to be set up on in an unfamiliar location in about half an hour.

We traveled down to Santa Barbara to see our son in Midsummer Night’s Dream, where he played Peter Quince (the leader of the play within a play). I made a video recording of both performances, but haven’t yet rendered it to put it up on YouTube.  The play was difficult to film, as they had a lot of the action in the audience, and I had a hard time panning the camera fast enough to catch what was going on.  I liked the production, but I never know how much of that is just my bias towards anything my son is in.

After my son got home from Santa Barbara, all three of us took the bus to San Jose to see Merry Wives of Windsor in Willow Street Park. The performance space in Willow Street Park is quite nice—a very large stage area with a steeply raked bowl for the audience and a wooded backdrop. It was a fun production, but not quite at the high standards of Santa Cruz Shakespeare (more at the level of good student productions).  The performance was free (suggested $10 donation at the end), subsidized in part by the San Jose City Council, I believe.  We spent as much on getting to the performance as we did on the show. Unfortunately, we probably won’t be able to go to the other Silicon Valley Shakespeare productions this summer, as they are in Sanborn Park, which is inaccessible by public transportation. (We might be able to use Lyft to and from the Lawrence Expressway train station, but that makes for a fairly long trip, and catching the last Highway 17 bus home could be difficult.)

Last night we went to see Santa Cruz Shakespeare’s production of The 39 Steps, a farce based on Hitchcock’s movie of the same name. The production is amazing, with the 4 actors playing dozens of roles (well, one actor has 1 role, the actress has 3 roles, and the remaining roles are all played by the 2 remaining actors). The costumes and costume changes were perfect. The show was hilarious and has been getting good reviews—I was surprised to see that Grove had not been sold out and that there was a lot of groundling space still available.

All four actors in the Scottish inn scene, photo from the SCS media page https://www.santacruzshakespeare.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/The-39StepsPhoto5_300dpi.rrjones.jpg

Santa Cruz Shakespeare is doing only comedies this summer (the other two are Measure for Measure and Two Gentlemen of Verona). Their interns are doing Candide, and the company will be doing two staged readings: A Most Dangerous Woman and The Night that Never Existed. We, of course, are planning to see it all.

We took public transit to the Audrey Stanley Grove last night, which really meant about 2.4 miles by bus and 2 miles walking.  It would have been almost as fast to walk the whole way, as we could have gone a slightly more direct route. We took the newly built path from Park Way Trail (at the end of Park Way) up to the Audrey Stanley Grove. It is a very steep path that my wife was willing to do uphill, but not downhill—I’d be a little reluctant to take it in the dark also. The trail is definitely a hiking trail and not for bicycles. We ended up taking Lyft home, which for the three of us was not much more expensive than the bus and much more convenient.

2016 June 11

Love’s Labour’s Lost

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 07:54
Tags: , , ,
Boyet with the ladies of France

Boyet with the ladies of France

Last weekend, my wife and I took a trip down to Santa Barbara, for three purposes:

  • To see our son play Boyet in Love’s Labour’s Lost with Shakespeare in the Park
  • To bring him two large wheeled duffel bags that we had stored for him
  • To bring back about 100 pounds of his luggage

Earlier in the week, we had seen UCSC’s Shakes to Go do a very stripped down version of Love’s Labour’s Lost (45 minutes) at the elementary school where my wife works. It was interesting to contrast the two productions: one of which has to travel and be performed for elementary and middle-school audiences with no on-stage rehearsal, and the other which is only performed twice before a primarily adult audience.

The UCSC version had to be ruthlessly cut to fit in the class period schedules of schools, and almost all the verbal jests had to be jettisoned. Given that the play is full of now-obscure puns and sexual innuendo, there was not much left but the bare bones of the plot. It was still funny enough to amuse the students, but it was a bit unsatisfying for adults.  All 10 actors were theater majors, which is not surprising given the time commitment (a quarter of rehearsals, followed by a quarter with dozens of performances, each of which can take up a full morning).

The UCSB version was not cut as drastically (about twice as long with a running time of 1:28), but many of Berowne’s longer speeches were cut to the bone, and some jokes were lost.  The costuming was more elaborate for this production, and there was less double casting (17 actors instead of 10 makes a huge difference).  Several of the actors were not theater majors and one did not even have English as a native language, but the acting and directing was overall very good.

I took my cameras with me to UCSB and recorded the two performances of the play (with the permission of the director), so you can see for yourself how the production went (I think I did a better job of filming for the Sunday production than the Saturday one):

Saturday:

Sunday:

We were in a hurry on Saturday, so we took the Greyhound from Santa Cruz to Santa Barbara, making it in time to eat supper with him at Buddha Bowls before his 5:00 call.  Greyhound is the fastest public transit to Santa Barbara, but we prefer the comfort of the Coast Starlight train, even though it adds several hours to the trip, so we took the Coast Starlight and the Highway 17 Express back on Monday.

We had some time to kill between feeding him and the performance starting at 7:30, so we walked around the lagoon on the UCSB, which has quite a variety of birds (we saw egrets, cormorants, and a great blue heron).

I believe that this heron we saw is a great blue heron, based on pictures of herons I found on the web.

I believe that this heron we saw is a great blue heron, based on pictures of herons I found on the web.

On Sunday, we helped clean part of the apartment and pack most of his clothes and bedding, leaving him with enough to get through to his trip home on Wednesday.  He ended up with an easily managed load of luggage, after he stored his bicycle with the police for the summer (a very handy service that cuts down on bike theft and abandoned bikes).

The large rolling duffel bag that we brought home for him was overloaded (68 pounds, compared to Amtrak’s 50lb limit), so I had to rearrange the luggage at the train station on Monday—I’d anticipated this need, so it only took a couple of minutes to remove the already packed pannier from the duffel, and transfer a few clothes to the carry-on suitcase.

One big difference from when I was a student is that he had practically no books—what few textbooks he’d had this year he’d been able to get electronically, and most of his recreational reading is from the web rather than on paper.

We had a little time to kill Sunday afternoon while he caught up on sleep (there’d been a cast party Sat night), so we looked at the newly refurbished library on the UCSB campus. The facilities seem quite nice, but were overloaded on the weekend before finals.  There seem to be enough computers and power outlets, but not enough WiFi bandwidth (we heard students talking about going elsewhere to study, because of problems with the WiFi).

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: