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2018 January 3

SOT-23 FETs for half H-bridge

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 20:53
Tags: , , , , ,

In Breakout board for SOT-23 FETs, I gave the schematic and layout pictures for a half H-bridge breakout board using SOT-23 surface-mount FETs.  The boards arrived today, 12 days after I ordered them. The boards cost $4.86 plus $23.79 shipping, but I had them panelize the design, and they sent me 13 copies instead of 10, so I ended up with 546 boards (instead of 420), making a cost of 5.24¢ each.

One of the panelized board. The panels are just separated with V cuts, so the corner rounding is not very good, but there is some, and I did not end up with sharp corners after cutting off a row of boards with tin snips.

With the transistors, capacitor, and headers, each half H-bridge will cost under 40¢ in 100s—much less than the approximately $1.37/half H-bridge that separate TO-220 FETs cost.

Today I tried soldering on a  PMV20XNER nFET (14.9¢ in 100s) and SSM3J332R pFET (12.4¢ in 100s), a 5-long right-angle header, and a 10µF ceramic capacitor. I wanted to do this with pretty much the same tools the students would have, so I did not use a board holder nor cross-lock tweezers (both of which would have made the job slightly easier).  My technique was simple:

  • Put the board face up on the bench.
  • Place one FET using sharp-pointed tweezers.
  • Tape the FET and the drain side down with a tiny piece of blue painters’ tape.
  • Solder the source and gate.
  • Remove the tape.
  • Solder the drain.
  • Repeat for the other FET.
  • Put the headers through the holes (from the component side).
  • Flip the board over and solder the header.
  • Put the header pins into a breadboard at the edge of the board.
  • Insert the capacitor from the component side.
  • Prop the breadboard up so the solder side of the board is exposed.
  • Solder the capacitor in place and trim its leads.

Soldering the first board went well.  The second one was a little harder (I had a bit of hand tremor), but still only took a few minutes.  Having made the lands huge (big enough for wave soldering) made alignment fairly simple—I did not have to be exact.

I tried one FET without the trick of taping the FET in place—that did not work at all, as the FET moved completely off the pad when I tried to solder.  I had to remove solder from the board with a solder sucker and redo the FET using tape.

Here are the front and back of the boards before and after populating, along with the pointed tweezers I used for placing the FETs.

Here is a close-up of one of the two boards I soldered (the one with the worst alignment—see the pFET at the top left).

I spent the rest of the afternoon checking that the boards were OK.  I used essentially the same setup as I used for Ron vs Vgs for pFETs and nFETS, with a 24Ω load and a 10V ramp that gradually turned the transistor off.  Because the test was the same, I plotted the results together with the old results:

The PMV20XNER transistor has a much lower threshold than the other nFETS I’ve looked at, but a comparable Ron to the other power nFETs.

The SSM3J332R pFET also has a low threshold voltage and the on resistance is in the same range as others we have used in the past.

It looks to me like the half-H-bridge will be a perfectly reasonable way for the students to get FETs for the class-D amplifier.  The current will be somewhat limited by the power dissipation of the pFET, but with an 8Ω speaker and 0.1Ω pFET, the power to the loudspeaker should be 80 times the power lost in the pFET, so the 10W limit on the loudspeaker should be reached well before the half H-bridge overheats.

Update: the EAGLE and Gerber files for this board are available at https://users.soe.ucsc.edu/~karplus/bme51/pc-boards/

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2017 December 22

Breakout board for SOT-23 FETs

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 23:25
Tags: , , , , , ,

After a discussion in the comments of Ron vs Vgs for pFETs and nFETS with Michael Johnson, I decided to design my own breakout boards for SOT-23 surface-mount FETs, with the possible use of them in the class-D amplifier lab in place of the through-hole TO-220 FETs we’ve been using.

I picked a couple of 30V FETs (one nFET, one pFET) whose data sheets indicated that they would have adequately low on-resistance with a gate voltage of only 2.5V (–2.5V for the pFET), so that the FETs could be controlled by a 3.3V logic signal with no problems.  I ended up picking PMV20XNER for nFET (14.9¢ in 100s) and SSM3J332R for pFET (12.4¢ in 100s).

Although the drain-to-source voltage is allowed to go to 30V, the gate-to-source voltage is more limited (±12V for both the nFET and the pFET).  That should be adequate for anything we do in the course, as our maximum power supply is ±5V, so we shouldn’t see any voltage differences bigger than 10V.  (I could have saved a few cents by using 20V FETs instead of 30V ones, maybe.)

Because the students use the FETs in an H-bridge, I decided to make my breakout board be a half H-bridge, with an nFET, a pFET, a bypass capacitor, and 5 right-angle header pins:

The schematic is quite simple. (The diodes are the body diodes of the FETs.)

The layout took me a while, because I wanted to make as much heat sinking as I could get on a small, cheap board.  The standard footprint for a ST-23 allows a thermal resistance of about 120 K/W. I did not push too hard though, because even with ideal layout, the SOT-23 packages still have terrible thermal conductivity (about 90 K/W)—essentially all the heat is being conducted through the thin drain pin.  (The SSM3J332R reports even worse numbers: 300 K/W with minimum footprint and 120 K/W with a square inch of copper.)

Solder side of the board. Visualization provided by https://gerber-viewer.easyeda.com/

Component side of the board. Visualization provided by https://gerber-viewer.easyeda.com/

My board is not nearly a square inch of copper—the entire board is only 15mm × 12.5mm, and only half of that is used for heatsinking the drains. I used the back of the board for radiating heat and provided thermal vias around the drain pads to connect the front and back. The footprint for the pads is one provided by the manufacturers for wave soldering—I thought it would be easier for had soldering than the much smaller pads used for reflow soldering.

The gate connections are on the outside, the source connections just inboard of them, and the shared drain in the middle.  The board is basically symmetric with respect to nFET and pFET, but I labeled the two sides so that there would be less variation in how students soldered them up.

The bypass capacitor is close to the FETs (much closer than the students ever got on a bread board), so we should see less noise injection back into the power rails than we’ve seen in the past. The resistance of the source and drain traces adds another 5mΩ of resistance to the H-bridge, which is not too bad—the beardboard probably adds more like 50mΩ.

If I understood their website correctly, I should be able to get 10 copies of the tiny board panelized in a 6×7 array (so 420 boards after I cut them apart) for only $4.90 from Smart-Prototyping.com.  Of course, I’m in a hurry, so I ended up paying an extra $23.79 for shipping with DHL, so the order costs $28.69, or <7¢ a board.  I also ordered 10 40-pin right-angle male headers (enough for 80 boards) for $4.11 from AliExpress, raising the price to 12¢ a board.

With the transistors, each half H-bridge will cost under 40¢ in 100s—much less than the approximately $1.37/half H-bridge that the separate TO-220 FETs cost.

The difference in cost is not important for the course ($2 a student), so my main consideration is whether the students will learn more by doing some surface mount soldering with a fixed cMOS half-H-bridge design or by continuing to wire up separate transistors on the bread board (making the usual student errors of getting the pinout wrong or general miswiring).  There is still plenty of room for error on the half H-bridge: swapping transistors, getting 2 nFET or 2 pFET instead of one of each, putting the whole board in backwards to short the power supply through the body diodes, …. .

The SOT-23s can’t dissipate quite as much heat as the TO-220s, but we’ll probably not have much heat to dissipate in reasonable designs.  With a 5V supply, 8Ω load, and 73mΩ on-resistance, the power dissipation in the pFET should be only about 28mW and the nFET even less—way less than the 500mW or so that I expect the boards to be able to handle.  Shoot-through current is mainly what the students will need to worry about, as that can get quite high with the low on-resistances of both the nFET and the pFET.

I’ve ordered the boards and parts to test out using the SOT-23 FETs and half-H-bridge boards.  If they work out well, I’ll probably rewrite the class-D lab to have students do a little surface-mount soldering (SOT-23s are about the simplest intro).

2014 July 18

How to sell a widget

SparkFun has a tutorial on how to sell “widgets” through them at How to Sell Your Widget on SparkFun – Learn.SFE:

Have an awesome electronic widget that you want to get to market? Great! We are always listening for new ideas from our customers and the community. We get many inquires on this topic, so read this tutorial carefully to keep your product pitch from getting lost in the shuffle.

We’re lucky, here at SparkFun, to have an amazingly creative and talented group of customers. Not only can they identify gaps in the catalogs of electronics suppliers, they can create a gizmo that fills that hole. But, going beyond a prototype or even a limited-quantity production run, often the hardest task in getting your world-altering product out there is producing, marketing, and/or selling it to the masses. That’s where we come into the picture.

The advice there is seems fairly reasonable.  They offer a choice of two models: make it yourself and have them sell for you, or have them make it and pay you royalties.  They tell you how to pitch products to them and how to design for them to be able to manufacture stuff.  Most of the stuff they sell is PCB boards, so they give quite a bit of advice about PCB design to fit their pipeline—they use Eagle, but ‘All parts are placed on a 0.005″ grid. If possible, use a .05″ grid.’ That must get irritating with modern parts that are convenient round metric numbers, not mils.   They also want version numbers in the bottom copper, which is reasonable for some designs, but not all.  They also encourage people to use their Eagle libraries, but my son and I have found their pad layouts to be very sloppy (putting silkscreen over SMD layers, getting the keep-out areas off by a little bit, not fixing the fonts on the “>NAME” and “>VALUE” labels to meet their own requirements, and so forth).

Still, it is good that they put out their design rules and provide clear guidelines to new designers.

I’ve thought a few times about putting out some of my designs through SparkFun or Adafruit Industries—perhaps an improved version of the blinky EKG as a kit.  SparkFun now sells EKG electrodes and snap leads for them, and even have a heart-rate monitor board (based on the AD8232 chip) and the “BITalino” biomedical board, so I suspect that they are interested in the market.

The BITalino is outrageously expensive and their EKG electrodes are about 3 times the price of buying them at Amazon, but the AD8232 chip actually looks like a nice one for building an EKG front-end and reasonably priced, so I’m not sure they’d have much interest in a through-hole part kit for do-it-yourself EKG that isn’t quite as good, unless it could be sold very cheaply or as an educational product (which is what the blinky EKG is aimed at, anyway).

I have some other ideas for products that I might be marketable, but I don’t know whether I have the time to refine them to the point of pitching them to SparkFun.  I can justify some time spent on doing electronics as a hobby, some as necessary learning for teaching my applied electronics course for bioengineers, and some as engineering-for-manufacture experience (something I never had any instruction in, despite my years as an engineering professor). But when the electronics work starts cutting into the time I need to spend on writing my book, teaching my classes, or doing collaborative research with other faculty, then I have to draw the line.  I’ve also got a lot of administrative responsibilities now (undergrad director and faculty adviser for two BS degrees, Program Chair for bioengineering, and Vice Chair for the Biomolecular Engineering Department), so writing time and research time have gotten doubly precious.

I do have one project this summer that I’m going to try to get fabricated for me—it is all SMD parts, including some that are hard to solder by hand (pads under the chips), so I don’t want to do it myself.  The project also calls for a lot of identical boards (20 to 50 of them), so a prototyping house seems like the way to go.

I’m looking currently at Smart Prototyping to do the PC board fabrication and assembly—they may not be the cheapest, but they have a comprehensible pricing scheme on their website, and they replied within 12 hours of my request for a quote. They also have a nearly turnkey system—I send them the Gerber files and the Bill of Materials (BOM), and they’ll make the boards, buy the parts, and assemble the boards.  They’ll even test them for an additional charge, though these boards are simple enough that I can test them myself at about 5 seconds a board, so their testing would not be worthwhile unless they guaranteed their assembly (which none of the prototype houses can afford to do with untested designs).

I also considered Elecrow, which has a similar service, but their pricing information on the web page is rather vague: “For BGA or IC with pads under IC, The quotation will be a little higher.” and “We will give a discount for the PCB assembly service according the some factors (assembly time,Hard or Easy to assemble or requirements etc.).” I prefer sites that have clear pricing even if it is slightly higher, so that there are no surprises. I suppose I could ask Elecrow for a quote and see if they respond as promptly as Smart Prototyping did.

Incidentally, my design does not follow all SparkFun’s guidelines—for one thing, I placed parts on a 0.5mm grid, not a 0.005″ gird, and the board is not rectangular.  Still, if the design I’m working on turns out well, I might pitch it to them, as I see some potential for it appealing to the open-source hardware market, and the violations of their design guidelines made good sense for this application.  Note: I’m deliberately not saying what the design is—I’ll reveal it once I’ve gotten a working prototype, when I’ve decided whether I want to commercialize it or not.

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