Gas station without pumps

2018 November 17

New book cover draft 2

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 15:30
Tags: , , , ,

Based on comments by gflint, I tried changing the colorway for my new cover:

new blue cover

The new colorway looks a little less generic, but it is still a boring cover.

I’m still looking for suggestions for a better book cover.

I also got one more to-do note removed from the book today, by beefing up the soldering instructions a bit and drawing a new figure:

Cross section of a good solder joint for through-hole soldering.

I drew a crude sketch on a whiteboard, then edited an SVG file to produce the image. I’m getting a little better at creating SVG files (thanks to the practice for the FET image), but it is still a slow process—not as slow for me as trying to draw with a tool like Inkscape, though.

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2018 October 28

Redrawing figure in SVG

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 20:18
Tags: , , , , , ,

There is a figure in my book of the cross-section of a power nFET.  Originally, I used a figure from wikimedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_MOSFET#/media/File:Vdmos_cross_section_en.svg, but I wanted a color version, so I colorized it myself in Inkscape.  Unfortunately, the original SVG was poorly done—it looked like an inkscape conversion of a raster image to paths, which did not result in paths enclosing fillable areas with clean strokes around them, but separate paths filled with black for each stroke.  This made colorizing the image quite difficult.  I did (eventually) manage to make a colorized version, but I’ve never been happy with it.  The file is huge for an SVG file (over 81kB) and difficult to edit.  I’ve been wanting to do it right for some time, and I finally got around to it today.

What I did was to print out the version I’ve been using as a full-page image, then used a ruler to figure out how big each part was.  I then entered SVG code by hand to remake the image. I included comments to describe what each part did and used styles for the different materials, so editing is now easy.  I also made sure that the image is now symmetric and that all the rounded corners have smooth joins to the straight lines (the “q” command in the path “d” attribute makes that fairly easy. The new svg file is only 3425 bytes, even with the comments, and the pdf created from it is only 8kB, instead of 28kB.  Those size changes are not very important (the PDF for the book, after all, is now 25MB, up from 23.7MB last spring), but the image looks better now also.

WordPress.com does not let me upload svg files, but you can see the PDF produced from it by inkscape at https://gasstationwithoutpumps.files.wordpress.com/2018/10/nfet-cross-section.pdf

WordPress.com only lets me upload raster images for display, so I used inkscape to convert the hand-written SVG file to PNG just for this blog. The black line on the right edge seems to have been chopped off in the conversion, though the PDF conversion gets it right.

Here is the PNG generated by inkscape from the SVG file.

I tried uploading the SVG file to Wikimedia Commons, so it could be used on the Wikipedia Power MOSFET page, in place of the black-and-white image, but the uploaded file got rendered as a badly wrong black-and-white PNG file (with all colors converted to black), which is totally useless. I don’t have time to figure out how to tell it to do the conversion correctly, so I just asked them to delete the image again.

Here is the source code for the svg file, which I’m releasing with CC-BY-SA 4.0 (the original on WIkipedia that it was based on was released by Cyril Buttay as CC-BY-SA 3.0).











.label {font: italic 8px sans-serif;}
.super {font: italic 6px sans-serif; }
.arrow {stroke:black; fill:none; stroke-width:1; marker-end:url(#head) }
.wire {stroke:black; fill:none; stroke-width:1;}
.metal {stroke:black; fill:blue; stroke-width:1;}
.Nplus {stroke:black; fill:deeppink; stroke-width:1;}
.Nminus {stroke:black; fill:lightpink; stroke-width:1;}
.Pplus {stroke:black; fill:lightcyan; stroke-width:1;}
.poly {stroke:black; fill:tomato; stroke-width:1;}
.channel{stroke:none; fill:springgreen; stroke-width:1;}


<!-- Drawing the nFET cross-section in layers -->

<!-- the Nminus layer that is the bulk of the FET -->

N–

<!-- the drain including metal layer -->


Drain



<!-- the Nplus layer for the drain -->

N+

<!-- left source -->



Source


P+

N+



<!-- right source -->

P+

N+



<!-- gate -->



Gate



<!-- channel -->



Channel




2017 November 28

More SolidWorks

Filed under: Robotics — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 22:24
Tags: , , , , , ,

I spent most of my day today with SolidWorks, fixing the problems noted in Bugs found in first assembly of robot and adding new layers to the robot. I’m getting a bit better at using SolidWorks, but I still find it to be an overly complicated interface with way too many modes.  I’m sure that there is a way to get it to start up with reasonable document parameters (like using mm instead of inches, or using the same settings as already open documents), but I’ve not taken the time to try to track that down.

Here is the model as it stands so far:

View from the front left of the robot. The octagon floating on top is a the beacon-detector board, which will be on standoffs that I didn’t bother to include in the model.

I cut out the three layers of the robot today, making two mistakes in the process. One mistake I caught right away, and just recut the layer after fixing the problem—there was an extra alignment circle that was not supposed to be cut that I had forgotten to erase. The other error was just as serious, but I didn’t notice it until I got home—the top layer did not have the slots cut in it for the spacers from layer 2 to layer 3. It is hard to notice this problem in looking at the SolidWorks model, as the 3D model looks the same whether the slots are cut or not. I should have noticed it when I created the dxf file for cutting the third layer, but by then I was getting pretty tired and careless. I’ll have to cut another copy on Thursday.  Luckily MDF is cheap—each layer costs me about $1, and I still have half a dozen 1-foot squares of MDF left.

Incidentally, I came up with what I think will be a cheap fix for the potential problem of the bumper springs not being stiff enough.  I added another switch front and center, just for the spring in the switch to push the bumper forward.  At 60¢ a switch, this is not a particularly expensive way to add a spring, and it saved me a lot of modeling and building time.  I could even wire up the switch if I can think of a use for it.

One other thing I made today was a “drill” test, to see what size holes were really made by the laser cutter from specifications.  I created the guide in SVG using a short Python program (so that I could tweak things easily. It took me quite a while to get the SVG just right, because of weird limitations of SVG, like that the path commands can’t take units for the coordinates. Also because I was using Inkscape to translate the SVG to the DXF format that the RDWorks laser-cutter software needs, and Inkscape assumes that the “pixels” are 90/inch for that conversion.  It is kind of messed up that SVG works in terms of “pixels”, since it is supposed to be Scalable Vector Graphics.  Inkscape only converts paths to DXF (not other shapes, like circles and text), so I wrote the program to generate paths and used Inkscape’s object-to-path conversion to convert the text.

Here is the piece I cut:

The circles were cut at 14mm/s and 100% (actually clipped at 67%) and the numbers were written at 140mm/s and 20%.

The holes were exactly the right size (to the 0.1mm limitations of my calipers), and the circular pieces that were cut out were 0.35–0.4mm smaller in diameter. That is, the kerf is about 0.19±0.02mm and it is on the inside of arcs.

Here is the code I used for generating the SVG file:

#!/usr/bin/env python

from __future__ import division, print_function

# all sizes are given in units of 0.1 mm

# Inkscape coverts pixels to real-world units in DXF at 90 pixels/in

pix_per_inch = 90
mm_per_inch = 25.4
pix_per_mm = pix_per_inch / mm_per_inch
pix_per_unit = 0.1*pix_per_mm

print('<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>')
print('<svg width="150mm" height="150mm" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">');

y=100   # y-position of first row of circles

x_space = 60    # spacing between circles
stroke = 1       # stroke-width

xmax = None     # largest value for x

text_space =35  # space from circle to label

for diams in [range(5,50,5), range(50,80,5), range(80,105,5), range(105,130,5)]:
    x=100 # left edge of first circle
    for diam in diams:
        x += diam/2
        print ('<path stroke="red" fill="none" stroke-width="1" d="M {sx},{sy} \
a {r},{r} 0,0,0 {r},{r} \
a {r},{r} 0,0,0 {r},-{r} \
a {r},{r} 0,0,0 -{r},-{r} \
a {r},{r} 0,0,0 -{r},{r} z" />'.format(sx=(x-diam/2)*pix_per_unit, sy=y*pix_per_unit,
                r=diam/2*pix_per_unit))

        print('<text x="{}" y="{}" stroke="blue" fill="blue" text-anchor="middle" font-family="Verdana" font-size="10">'.format(
                x*pix_per_unit,(y+diam/2+text_space)*pix_per_unit))
        print(diam/10)
        print('</text>')
        x += diam/2 + x_space
        last_diam=diam
        if xmax is None or x>xmax:
                xmax = x
    y+=2*last_diam+text_space

print('<path stroke="red" fill="none" stroke-width="1" d="M 0,0 h {} v {} h {} z" />'.format(
        xmax*pix_per_unit,(y-last_diam)*pix_per_unit,
        -xmax*pix_per_unit))

print ('</svg>')

2013 March 18

Last day of circuits class

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 18:06
Tags: , , , , ,

Today was an attempt to cover questions that students had sent me over the weekend.

I talked a little about PN junctions (using the analogy of diffusion of sodium and potassium across the cell membrane from last week’s guest lecture to discuss the voltage that is produced by diffusion of holes and electrons across the PN junction).  We then covered diodes, photodiodes (and photovoltaic cells), bipolar transistors, and phototransistors.  That whole lecture needs to come before the phototransistor lab.

I then talked about class A, B, and C amplifiers: all of which are the same amplifier structure, but with different bias voltages.  I described (in rough terms) the efficiency of each circuit and gave an application for a class C amplifier driving a LC resonant load.  I then gave a crude bipolar class AB output circuit, as basically two class-B circuits with opposite polarities.

We also discussed (very briefly) brushed DC motors and stepper/brushless motors.

We ended with some redesign of the T-shirt for the course.  I’ll be showing them a new draft of the design tomorrow and taking their orders. Once the design is finalized, I’ll put a rendition of it on this blog—though it will not be the original design, since I’m doing this one in SVG using Inkscape, and WordPress.com still doesn’t support svg images.

 

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