Gas station without pumps

2015 November 27

Donations

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 12:26
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I get inundated with requests to donate money to worthy causes—most of my hardcopy mail consists of such appeals.  Some I recycle unopened, some I open and glance over before recycling, and a very few I respond to.  I’ve started making some rules for myself about which ones I respond to:

  • Ones that are based just on emotional appeals with pictures of the supposed beneficiaries: recycle.
  • Ones that send me letters frequently (more than twice a year): recycle unopened.
  • Ones that tell me when I last donated and how much: seriously consider donating the same amount or more again, as long as it has been at least 10 months since the last donation.
  • Donations to politicians: recycle unopened.
  • Ones that I’ve looked up on various charity-watch websites and determined to be scams (or at least very inefficient charities): recycle unopened.
  • Year-end appeals: recycle.  (I prefer to make my donations in the spring or summer—trying to guilt-trip people who may have winter depression or holiday stress strikes me as too cynical a ploy.)

There are a few exceptions to these guidelines:

  • Newsletters from organizations that I have signed up for newsletters from are welcome (Southern Poverty Law Center, Jewel Theatre, Museum of Art and History, Friends of the Santa Cruz Public Libraries, Shakespeare Santa Cruz, … )
  • Notices of special events from organizations that I donate to don’t count against the “frequent nagger” penalty, but end-of-year donation requests and “matching-fund” donation requests most certainly do.
  • I do give to political campaigns occasionally (which is how I got on the “sucker” lists for political donations), but I do it on my own timing and never in response to mailings. The ones asking by mail for me to donate are rarely for politicians I would want to support, even though they may belong to the same political party as people I have supported. If someone is taking money from billionaires, then they don’t need my money and aren’t going to listen to my voice—they’ve already been bought, and I’m not about to throw my money away supporting yet another voice for the billionaires.

My biggest donations are done by payroll reduction, split between United Way, Planned Parenthood, and Second Harvest Food Bank.  My next biggest donation is to Santa Cruz Shakespeare, which is going to need a lot this year in order to build a new performance space, now that UCSC has refused to let them continue to use the Festival Glen (a very short-sighted decision on UCSC’s part, in my opinion, as the community goodwill and press coverage were worth a lot, not even mentioning the rent they collected).  After this year, I may be splitting my theater donations up more (I didn’t donate to Jewel Theatre or West Performing Arts this year, but probably will next year).

I give token amounts or membership dues to a number of charitable organizations.  From most of them, what I’d like is a monthly newsletter by e-mail (so I can see what they are doing) and an annual reminder that it is time to renew (with the date of the last donation).  Hardcopy newsletters are ok, but e-mail generally wastes less of the donated money.

I’ve started dropping from my list any that send several donation requests a year, hoping to double dip by taking advantage of donor forgetfulness.  Generally I start by missing a year—if they send me a single letter saying when I last donated and asking if I missed donating to them, then I generally renew.  If they start flooding my mailbox with generic pleas for money, I drop them.

This year, I’m thinking of giving to two organizations that have done particularly good appeals—ones that stood out from the pile of trash that usually comes in the mail:

The Friends of the Santa Cruz Public Library, whom we usually join every year, have started a "New Year's Eve Gala" for introverts—the idea is you stay home and read a book.

The Friends of the Santa Cruz Public Library, whom we usually join every year, have started a “New Year’s Eve Gala” for introverts—the idea is you stay home and read a book.

I've not donated to UNICEF for decades, I think, but the idea of buying yourself off a donor mailing list is appealing (the first time—if other charities start doing it, it'll be recycle-unopened status for them).

I’ve not donated to UNICEF for decades, I think, but the idea of buying yourself off a donor mailing list is appealing (the first time—if other charities start doing it, it’ll be recycle-unopened status for them).

I think I’ll give some extra money to Friends of the Library, and a one-time donation to UNICEF, just to reward them for having more imaginative campaigns that stood out against the relentless give-me-your-money-or-the-baby-dies guilt-tripping of most charitable organizations.

4 Comments »

  1. The “donate once and we won’t bother you again” technique is featured prominently in one of the Freakonomics books. I can’t remember which charity pioneered the strategy.

    Comment by V John — 2015 November 27 @ 15:04 | Reply

    • I didn’t think that UNICEF had invented the strategy, but it was the first time I saw it “live”.

      I’m a life member of a few organizations (International Youth Hostels, League of American Bicyclists, Adventure Cycling), because I liked the idea of paying once and not having to deal with annual membership dues. Those are organizations I joined when was young, with my first permanent job. As I get older, lifetime membership is less return on the investment, but organizations have made it much more expensive, so I’m unlikely to become a life member of anything else.

      Comment by gasstationwithoutpumps — 2015 November 27 @ 15:12 | Reply

  2. Planned Parenthood, alas, is one of the organizations that sends me mailings every week or two. I can’t hold it too much against them under the circumstances, but it definitely doesn’t make me happy.

    Comment by Irene — 2015 November 30 @ 11:49 | Reply

    • I donate to the local chapter of Planned Parenthood, not the national organization, and I do it through payroll deduction. I get a thank you note once a year, and maybe one or two other pieces of mail from them. They are not one of the organizations that floods my mailbox. Perhaps you should contact the organization that you donate to, and let them know that the flood of mail is counter-productive.

      Comment by gasstationwithoutpumps — 2015 November 30 @ 11:57 | Reply


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