Gas station without pumps

2018 August 29

3D printed names

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 11:57
Tags: , ,

To explore OpenSCAD and 3D printing further, I have made two more objects: a key holder for my home and office keys and a nametag.  I’m not planning to put these items on Thingiverse, since they have my name on them and would need to be customized.

The key holder was printed as two plates with holes 65mm apart. One hole had a round surround to accept a socket-head M3 screw, while the other hole had a hexagonal surround to accept an M3 nut.

The basic idea of the key holder is simple: two identical plates held together with M3 stainless-steel screws, with the keys capable of rotating on the screws. The hexagonal socket for the nut was just a little tight, so I had to hammer the nuts into the plate, which turned out to be a good thing, as the nuts are then held firmly by the plate.

I printed a textured surface by designing in shallow V-shaped grooves, and removing my name somewhat deeper. My first attempt printed the lettering and grooves on the top of the print, which resulted in a rather rough surface, due to all the retractions made between printing the separate islands. My second attempt printed face down, to get a smooth surface as seen here.

The keys fold out like a utility knife and provide a more convenient handle for turning the key than the usual small tab. I’ve deliberately erased the information-bearing part in the picture of the key.

Because the name did not stand out well, I tried painting the recessed areas with acrylic paint (no primer). The paint does not stick all that well to the bare PLA, and I got some paint stuck in the little crevices on the surface outside the letters. It looks ok from a distance, but closer up it is rather messy, as can be seen in the photo above.

The key holder holds 6 keys—3 at each end. The keys were not of equal thickness, so I added some 3D-printed washers with the thinner stack of keys. I printed several washers in different thicknesses (1mm to 3mm in 0.5mm steps), and tried different combinations until I got a pair that provided the right spacing. Putting the spacers outside the keys seems to work better than putting them between the keys.

I’m still not sure about the wisdom of having my name on my key holder—it makes it easy for someone to return my keys if I accidentally leave them somewhere, but it also makes it easier for a thief who finds the keys to figure out where they are keys for! I haven’t lost my keys or had them stolen in my 32 years of living in Santa Cruz, so I’m not too concerned about either outcome.

One problem I have noticed with the key holder is that the stainless-steel screws can work loose, particularly from repeated use of the bike key, which has high friction to the screw passing through it. I may want to get a little threadlock to reduce the chance of the key holder coming apart accidentally.

The nametag is thinner than the plates of the key holder (2mm instead of 4mm), and printed with finer layers, but its diagonal size (103.8mm) is almost the largest that can be printed on the Monoprice Delta Mini (which has a 110mm limit).  It took about 2 hours to print.

I printed this only 2mm thick with the lettering recessed 1mm. Once again it was printed face down and I tried painting the recessed areas with acrylic paint.  I had a little less paint in the crevices around each letter, but still enough to look a bit messy.

The nametag was slightly too large for the holder I had designed it for (probably due to a combination of spreading of the first layer and my not allowing for the 2mm thickness), but it works ok in this somewhat oversized holder.

The nametag “worked” but does not look very good—I think that a maker would be better off with a PC board or laser-etched nametag, either of which could provide much better quality.

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2018 August 19

Santa Cruz Shakespeare 2018

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 14:06
Tags: ,

I have now seen all of the Santa Cruz Shakespeare productions for 2018, except the intern’s show Men I’m Not Married To, which starts on Wed 22 August.  There are four performances left of Love’s Labours Lost, Romeo and Juliet, and Venus in Fur, plus the three performances of the intern’s show.

Santa Cruz Shakespeare Venus in Fur 2018
Photo by Shmuel Thaler (from https://www.santacruzshakespeare.org/about/media-room/ )

All the performances are worth seeing, but Venus in Fur is definitely the highlight of the season—it is the play that the set was designed around (the set doesn’t really work for the Shakespearean plays), it has the best lighting and sound effects, and it showcases the talents of two very strong actors.  Brian Ibsen’s interpretation of Thomas in Venus in Fur is outstanding,  which I had not expected from his rather lackluster performance as Berowne in Love’s Labours Lost.  Even more impressive is María Gabriella Rosado González’s performance as Vanda, switching seamlessly between three different characters: actress, Victorian woman, and goddess.  The only thing that marred the production was the miking of the actors—occasionally the amplification failed.  It might have been better not to mike them at all (I might not have felt that way if I had been seated further back—audibility of some actors can be a problem in outdoor theater).

I reviewed Love’s Labours Lost earlier, when I saw the first preview—I’ll see it again at the end of the run, when it may have improved a bit.

The Romeo and Juliet is a fairly straightforward, traditional interpretation of the play, despite changing the genders of Benvolio and Tybalt to meet SCS’s goal of having gender balance in their cast.  SCS will be ending the season this year with a number of matinees of Romeo and Juliet for local high-school students—probably the best choice for educational purposes.

In addition to the full productions, SCS also did two free staged readings this year The Doll’s House and The Taming.  The reading of The Doll’s House was very polished for a staged reading and was well worth attending.  I had mixed feelings about The Taming: the play was funny, but some of the lines were rushed and the actresses sometimes difficult to hear.  It was worth going, but was clearly not as rehearsed as The Doll’s House. The Taming is also a play with a fairly short half-life, being full of topical references and slang—if they plan to do a full production of it, they’ll have to do it in the next couple of years.

 

2018 August 14

3D-printed small snifter

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 11:51
Tags: , , , , , ,

To practice using a different feature of OpenSCAD, I tried making a wine glass by rotating a 2D outline around the Z-axis.  OpenSCAD has much more limited 2D capabilities than SVG, allowing only polygons, not smooth curves, so it took me a while to come up with a way to get a decent shape with just a few vertices.

The tiny wine glass looks ok, but the single-layer walls of the bowl leak, and the stem is too springy.

My first design was based on a tall, thin wine glass, but the glass was too tall for the print volume of the Monoprice Delta Mini printer, so I tried printing it scaled down by a factor of 2. The printer had a lot of trouble with this tiny design. Perhaps the biggest problem is that the thin stem is too flexible, so the printer head dragged the bowl around as it was printing. The stick-slip action resulted in a few small holes in the single-layer bowl.

I then tried adjusting the design so that the default settings would still produce the wine glass, but different settings would match a mini-snifter that does fit in the print volume. This mini-snifter has a bowl volume of about 135ml (4.5oz), and the snifter weighs 33g. I printed it at 0.15 mm/layer, with a wall count of 5 in Cura, 6 top and bottom layers, and 10% infill.

The roughness of the surface is probably due to inconsistent feeding of filament, except where the bowl flares out widely. There the filament is drooping a bit due to insufficient support.

The mini-snifter holds water and is a reasonably close approximation to the glass that I was copying.

Side view of the snifter, showing the “seam” that results from Cura starting each layer by moving to the same starting position on the circle.

Bottom view of the snifter, showing the flat surface created by the glass bed added to my printer.

Inside view of the bowl of the snifter.

Snifter on its side, to show the roughness of the printing where the bowl widens unsupported. The vertices of the polygon that is rotated are also clearly visible here as three lines around the bowl.

I’ve included the OpenSCAD source code below, but it can be more easily downloaded from
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3049512

// OpenSCAD module for making goblets
// Kevin Karplus
// 2018 Aug 14
// Creative Commons - Attribution - Non-Commercial - Share Alike license.</pre>

function interp(x, y0, y1) = (1-x)*y0 + x*y1;

// Goblet using rotation about Z-axis
// Defaults are for a tall, narrow wine glass: too tall for the
// Monoprice Delta Mini 3D printer
// h is height
// foot_r is radius of foot
// foot_h is height of foot where it joins stem
// stem_r is radius of stem
// stem_h is height of stem where it joins bowl
// bowl_bottom_r is radius of bowl at stem_h
// bowl_mid_r is radius of bowl at h-bowl_mid_depth
// bowl_top_r is radius of bowl at top
// thickness is thickness of sides of bowl.
module goblet(h= 214, foot_r=36, foot_h=12, stem_r=4, stem_h=110,
bowl_bottom_r=12, bowl_mid_r=28, bowl_mid_depth=42,
bowl_top_r=25, thickness=1.5)
{
bowl_depth=h-stem_h;
sphere_width = interp(0.75, bowl_mid_r,bowl_bottom_r) -thickness;
echo( "sphere_width=", sphere_width);

delta_r =interp(0.5,bowl_mid_r,bowl_bottom_r)-bowl_bottom_r;
delta_d =bowl_depth-interp(0.7,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth);
echo("delta_d=", delta_d, "delta_r=",delta_r);
alpha = atan( delta_d/delta_r);
echo ("alpha=", alpha);
sphere_radius= sphere_width/sin(alpha);
sphere_height = stem_h+sphere_radius;
echo( "sphere_radius=", sphere_radius);

difference()
{
rotate_extrude($fa=2)
{ polygon(
points=[
// foot
[0,0], [foot_r,0], [foot_r,thickness],
[foot_r-4, thickness],
[stem_r*1.5, foot_h- 0.5*stem_r],

// stem
[stem_r,foot_h],
[stem_r, stem_h*0.75],
[interp(0.5,stem_r,bowl_bottom_r), 0.9*stem_h],

//bowl
[bowl_bottom_r,stem_h],
[interp(0.5,bowl_mid_r,bowl_bottom_r),
h-interp(0.7,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[interp(0.2,bowl_mid_r,bowl_bottom_r),
h-interp(0.5,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[bowl_mid_r,
h-interp(0.2,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[bowl_mid_r,
h-interp(-0.07,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[bowl_top_r, h],
[bowl_top_r-thickness, h],
[bowl_mid_r-thickness,
h-interp(-0.07,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[bowl_mid_r-thickness,
h-interp(0.2,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[interp(0.2,bowl_mid_r,bowl_bottom_r) -thickness,
h-interp(0.5,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[interp(0.5,bowl_mid_r,bowl_bottom_r)-thickness,
h-interp(0.7,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[interp(0.75,bowl_mid_r,bowl_bottom_r)-thickness,
h- interp(0.85,bowl_mid_depth,bowl_depth)],
[0,stem_h]
]);
};
translate([0,0,sphere_height])
color("red")
intersection()
{ sphere(r=sphere_radius, $fs=0.1);
translate([0,0,-2*sphere_radius+delta_d])
cube([10*sphere_radius, 10*sphere_radius, 2*sphere_radius],
center=true);
}
}

}

// The default example is for a small snifter, with an interior volume of about 135ml.
// Printed in PLA with 0.15mm layers, wall line count 5, top and bottom layer count 6, and 10% infill, it weighs 33g.
goblet(h=95, foot_r=29, foot_h=10, stem_r=4.5, stem_h=30,
bowl_bottom_r=18, bowl_mid_r=33, bowl_mid_depth=40,
bowl_top_r=23, thickness=1.8);
<pre>

2018 August 13

PG&E trying to screw people with home solar systems

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 11:22
Tags: , , ,

PG&E informed me that they were requesting an increase in minimum bill amounts for electricity “to reduce bill volatility”, but did not say how much an increase they were requesting. I looked at the complete language of the proposal at http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/PublishedDocs/Efile/G000/M218/K401/218401655.PDF, but all it says is “Approval of this Proposal would increase electric rates for distribution customers by less than one percent; therefore, a statement setting forth PG&E’s proposed increases or changes to electric rates is not needed.”  So I have no idea how big a change they are proposing to the minimum bill.

I am currently paying the minimum bill amount monthly, so increasing that minimum amount will not “reduce bill volatility” for me, as bill volatility is already zero.  The change will definitely increase my bill, and probably by much more than 1%—but  it seems to be top-secret what my new bill will be.

So far as I can tell, PG&E’s primary aim is to extract more money from customers with net energy metering (NEM), making home solar energy systems less cost-effective, which works against California’s carbon-reduction goals.

If the increase in the minimum bill is less than 1%, then I have no major objection to the change, but if (as I suspect) it is much larger than the rate of inflation, then I strongly oppose the attempt to transfer costs primarily to NEM customers without even saying how much the increase is.

If anyone reading this blog is also a PG&E customer, you can send comments to
public.advisor@cpuc.ca.gov, making sure to include “R.12-06-013” somewhere in the subject line.

2018 August 3

Tool for sweeping roof valleys

Filed under: Uncategorized — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 21:42
Tags: , , , , ,

As I mentioned in Fixing Monoprice Delta Mini end stops,

I’ve also been working on creating broomstick threading on the printer, both to test the ability of the printer to do screw threads and to make a socket and bracket for attaching a broom head to a telescoping pole for cleaning the valleys of my tile roof.  I’ll post on that in a separate post, with pictures, once I get the whole thing working.

I designed the threads using OpenSCAD, which has no built-in support for creating helical structures like threaded rods and sockets. I found an open-source thread module on the web, but I found its parameterization awkward, so I ended up writing my own.

Here are my practice pieces for designing threaded rods and sockets with OpenSCAD, and printing them on the Monoprice Delta Mini.

All the test pieces were printed with the threads spiraling around the vertical Z-axis, to minimize the amount of unsupported filament. The undersides of the threads are a bit rough, but the roughness can be minimized by making the threads have a nearly triangular profile, so that only a little bit of filament is unsupported in each layer.

The first threaded rod, at the top left, screws easily into a broom head, and has fairly smooth surfaces, but was a bit too loose (diameters a little too small) and only a rather thin part of the thread was taking most of the contact force. The second one was sturdier, but still too loose.  The third one was too fat and would not screw into a broom head, but the fourth one was a good fit, screwing in easily, but not being wobbly.

The first two sockets worked with the first two printed screws, but not with the steel threads on my broom sticks—there was not enough clearance.  The third one fit fairly well and had smooth threads, but the threads were rather thin, and I felt they would not be sturdy enough. The two sockets with plates were beefier, and were experiments in seeing whether I could print horizontal screw holes.  I printed holes for #8 and #9 flat-head screws (countersunk), and the bridging did not cause problems with loose filaments.

I did have a little problem with the flat plates not printing properly, which I tracked down to the glass plate on the bed rotating a little in the clips (pretty much as Michael Johnson had warned me).  I fixed the problem by adding some dabs of hot-melt glue to hold the clips to the plate.  I have renew the hot-melt glue every few prints, since it does not bond the glass and the PLA permanently, but I find that an acceptable tradeoff for the ease of removing prints from glass rather than the bed that the printer comes with.

Here is the final socket attached to the broom head with 1″ #8 wood screws.

Of course, one socket at the end of the broom head would not be very secure—the length of the broom head makes a pretty big lever arm for twisting, and PLA is not that strong a plastic. So I designed a support for the broomstick at the other end of the broom head.  I could, perhaps, have used a commercial conduit strap, but the screw holes in them are a bit far apart for screwing to the broom head, so I made one that fits the broom handle I’m using precisely.

Here are the practice pieces I made, to make sure that the broom handle would fit and to check that I could make long screw holes. Note the notch on the right-hand example.

The first test piece held the broomstick well, but did not allow the broomstick to be inserted and withdrawn easily—there are a pair of screws on the brookstick that hold on the threaded end, and the screwheads stick out a little. The notch in the second test piece was carefully designed to just allow the screwheads through, but I added 1mm more clearance for the final piece.  The test pieces were printed with thin shells and 10% or 20% infill, and so were very light, but I printed the final pieces with thick shells and high infill (50%?), so that they ended up fairly solid.

The screw head on one side fits through the notch, and on the other side is in the diagonal space left by extending the circular hole to form a U. The block is held in place with 2″ #9 deck screws.

Although the deck screws were supposed to drill their own holes in the wood, I found that I had to drill pilot holes for them—the first one I inserted split the wooden broom head, which I had to glue back together. I also made a mistake in printing the U-shaped piece with the screw holes horizontal, as torquing down the last screw started to split the plastic along the laminations. If I were to reprint it, I would print it “legs-up” so that the deck screws compress the laminations together.

Here is the finished roof-valley sweeper, mounted on the telescoping pole.

The broom head is still usable as an ordinary broom, as the extra hardware does not interfere with inserting a broomstick in the normal way.

I used the roof-valley sweeper today to clean one of the roof valleys on my tile roof (the one reachable from the porch roof). It worked well to remove a year’s accumulation of leaves and twigs, though I’ll probably have to use it again this fall, after the trees have shed their leaves. I still have the other roof valleys to clean, which needs to be done with the telescoping pole from a ladder.

I don’t expect the PLA pieces to last forever (this is not UV-resistant material), but I store the broom head in a dark garage, so I expect to get a few year’s use out of them.

I’ve included the OpenSCAD source code below, but it can be more easily downloaded from
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3033594

The threaded_rod module:

// All dimensions in mm

// build a polygon for the cross-section of the thread 
// perpendicular to the thread.  
// The outer edge of the thread is on x=0 and all coordinate <=0
module thread_cross_section(height, pitch, base_fraction, top_fraction, pitch_angle)
{
    scale = cos(pitch_angle);
    scaled_top  = top_fraction*pitch*scale;
    scaled_base = base_fraction*pitch*scale;
    polygon(points= [ [-height,0], 
        [0, -(scaled_base-scaled_top)/2],
        [0, -(scaled_base+scaled_top)/2],
        [-height,-scaled_base]]);    
}

// one segment of the thread for the threaded rod, but oriented along the z-axis
module thread_segment(height, pitch, base_fraction, top_fraction, pitch_angle, segments_per_turn)
{
    length = pitch/(sin(pitch_angle) * segments_per_turn);
    // echo("pitch=",pitch, "pitch_angle=",pitch_angle, segments_per_turn,"segments, length=",length);
    linear_extrude(height=length, slices=1)
    {   thread_cross_section(height=height, pitch=pitch,
            top_fraction=top_fraction,
            base_fraction=base_fraction,
            pitch_angle=pitch_angle);
    }
}


// make a long cone for intersecting with screw to trim z=0 end
module chamfer_cone(inner_diam, outer_diam, chamfer_length, total_length)
{
    cylinder(d1=inner_diam, 
             d2=inner_diam+ (outer_diam-inner_diam)*total_length/chamfer_length,
            h=total_length, $fn=60);
}

// Build a threaded rod with trapezoidal threading
//       ____________                  _____________
//  ____/            \_______________/
// Threads start at z=0 on the x axis.
module threads(
        //Screw thread dimensions:
        //Length of Screw
        screw_length = 25.0,

        // Diameter at base of threads
        inner_diam = 13.5,
        // diameter at top of threads
        outer_diam = 18,

        //Thread Pitch
        pitch = 5.0,
        // Thread fraction (thickness of thread at base/pitch)
        base_fraction=1,
        // Thread fraction (thickness of thread at top/pitch)
        top_fraction=0,

        // how much of turn is made per segment of result
        degrees_per_segment=6,

        // chamfer at start (Z=0)  (defaults to pitch/2, use 0 to turn off)
        chamfer_start=-1,
        // chamfer at end (Z=screw_length)
        chamfer_end=0
        )
{
    pi= 3.1415926535897932346;
    pitch_angle = atan(pitch/ (pi *outer_diam));
    
    augmented_length = screw_length+pitch;
    turns = augmented_length/pitch;
    segments_per_turn = 360/ degrees_per_segment;
    segments = ceil(turns*segments_per_turn);
    
    // set the lengths for the chamfers if defaults needed
    local_chamfer_start = chamfer_start<0? pitch/2: chamfer_start;
    local_chamfer_end = chamfer_end<0? 0: chamfer_end; intersection() { if (local_chamfer_start>0)  
        {   chamfer_cone(inner_diam=inner_diam, 
                outer_diam=outer_diam, 
                chamfer_length=local_chamfer_start,
                total_length=augmented_length);
        }
        else
        {    cylinder(d=2*outer_diam, h=augmented_length);
        }
        translate([0,0,screw_length])   
            rotate([180,0,0]) 
                if (local_chamfer_end>0) 
                {     chamfer_cone(inner_diam=inner_diam, 
                    outer_diam=outer_diam, 
                    chamfer_length=local_chamfer_end,
                    total_length=augmented_length);
                }
                else
                {   cylinder(d=2*outer_diam, h=augmented_length); 
                }
        union()
        {
            color("red") cylinder(d=inner_diam+0.001, h=screw_length, $fn=segments_per_turn);
            for (i = [0:segments])
            {   angle = i*degrees_per_segment;
                translate([outer_diam*cos(angle)/2,
                          outer_diam*sin(angle)/2,
                          i*pitch*degrees_per_segment/360])
                    rotate([0,0,angle])
                        rotate([90-pitch_angle,0,0])
                thread_segment(height=(outer_diam-inner_diam)/2, 
                    pitch=pitch, 
                    base_fraction=base_fraction,
                    top_fraction=top_fraction, 
                    pitch_angle=pitch_angle, 
                    segments_per_turn=segments_per_turn);
            } 
        }
    }
}

// example
// rotate([-180,0,0]) union()
// {
//    color("green") translate([0,0,25-0.001])
//            cylinder(d=23, h=5,$fn=60);
//    threads(top_fraction=0.3, base_fraction=0.6, 
//        screw_length=25,
//        inner_diam=15, outer_diam=18);
// }

The broomstick socket:

use <threaded_rod.scad>

// create a screwhole for metric screw of given length,
// with head extending in -z direction and screw in +z direction
// Loose=0.10 for loose fit, 0.05 for tight fit, about -0.15 for threaded hole
module screw_hole(metric_size=3, length=10, loose=0.10)
{   union()
    {   cylinder(d=metric_size*(1+loose), h=length*1.1, $fs=0.3);  // body of screw
    translate([0,0,-metric_size]) cylinder(d=metric_size*2.2, h=metric_size*1.1, $fs=0.3);  // counterbore for head of screw
    }
}

// make countersunk hole for flathead screw
// surface on xy plane at (0,0), screw extends in +z direction.
// length is the length of the hole for the threads (past the base of the head)
// diam is the diameter of the hole for the screw threads
// depth is the depth of the countersink
// top_diam is the diameter at the surface (the xy plane)
module countersunk(length=35, diam=5, depth=3, top_diam=11)
{
    union()
    {    cylinder (d=diam, h=length+depth, $fs=0.3);   // hole for screw
        // countersink (adding 0.001 overshoot to avoid coincident faces)
        translate([0,0,-0.001]) cylinder (d1=top_diam+0.2, d2=diam, h=depth+0.1, $fs=0.3); 
    }
}

// make countersunk hole for 10-24 flathead machine screw
module countersunk_10_24(length=35)
{    countersunk(length=length, diam=5, depth=3, top_diam=11);

} 

// make countersunk hole for 8-32 flathead wood screw 
module countersunk_8_32(length=22, diam=4.3, top_diam=7.6, depth=3.2)
{
    countersunk(length=length, diam=3.2, top_diam=7.6, depth=3.2);
}


// example using broom handle thread
module broom_handle()
 {
    rotate([-180,0,0]) union()
    {
        color("green") translate([0,0,15-0.001]) cylinder(d=23, h=5,$fn=60);
        threads(top_fraction=0.35, base_fraction=0.7, 
            screw_length=15,
            inner_diam=15.5, outer_diam=18.5);
    }
}
// makes a threaded rod that matches the one in broom_handle,
// but bloats diameters and threads.
// By subtracting this from an object, we should be able to
// create an acceptable socket for the broom handle.
module bloated_broom_thread(bloat=0.5, depth=20,
	inner_diam=15.5,
	outer_diam=18.5,
	pitch=5,
	top_fraction=0.35,
	base_fraction=0.7)
{
    threads(top_fraction=min(0.95,top_fraction+0.5*bloat/pitch), 
        base_fraction=min(1,base_fraction+0.5*bloat/pitch), 
        screw_length=depth,
        inner_diam=inner_diam+bloat, outer_diam=outer_diam+bloat,
        pitch=pitch, chamfer_start=0);
}

// Make a cylinder with a plate whose outer edge is tangential to the cylinder
// cylinder has axis along z-axis.
// Plate is parallel to xz-plane on positive y side.
// The cylindrical boss has a fillet that goes from the diameter
//   an extra "fillet" mm wider on each side where it touches the plate.
module plate_with_boss(width=55, length=55, boss_diam=30, thickness=5, fillet=2.5)
{
   boss_radius = boss_diam/2;
   fillet_height=boss_radius-thickness;
   union()
   {  
      color("green")cylinder(d=boss_diam, h=length, $fn=90);
      color("red") translate([-width/2,boss_radius-thickness+0.001,0.001]) cube([width,thickness,length]);
      color("blue") translate([-boss_radius-0.001,0,-0.001]) cube([boss_diam+0.002, boss_radius-0.001, length]);
       linear_extrude(height=length)
       {    polygon(points=[
                [boss_radius-0.1, fillet_height+0.1],
                [boss_radius, fillet_height-fillet], 
                [boss_radius+0.25*fillet, fillet_height-0.5*fillet],
                [boss_radius+0.5*fillet, fillet_height-0.25*fillet],
                [boss_radius+fillet, fillet_height]
           ]);
       }
       linear_extrude(height=length)
       {    polygon(points=[
                [-boss_radius+0.1, fillet_height+0.1],
                [-boss_radius, fillet_height-fillet], 
                [-boss_radius-0.25*fillet, fillet_height-0.5*fillet],
                [-boss_radius-0.5*fillet, fillet_height-0.25*fillet],
                [-boss_radius-fillet, fillet_height]
           ]);
       }
   }  
}

boss_diam=28;
depth=30;   // length of threads in socket
width = 60; // width of plate
length = depth+4; // length of plate
thickness = 7;

screw_depth=max(0,thickness-3.5);  // leave thin plate closing hole

screw_x = boss_diam/2+7;
screw_y = boss_diam/2-thickness-0.001;
screw_z = 8;
screw_holes=true;
rotate([180,0,0])
    difference()
    {   plate_with_boss(boss_diam=boss_diam, length=length, width=width, thickness=thickness);
        translate([0,0,-0.01]) bloated_broom_thread(depth=depth);
        if (screw_holes)
        {    
            translate([screw_x, screw_y, screw_z])
                rotate([-90,0,0]) 
                    countersunk_8_32(length=screw_depth);
            translate([-screw_x, screw_y, screw_z])
                rotate([-90,0,0]) 
                    countersunk_8_32(length=screw_depth);
            translate([screw_x, screw_y, length-screw_z])
                rotate([-90,0,0]) 
                    countersunk_8_32(length=screw_depth);
            translate([-screw_x, screw_y, length-screw_z])
                rotate([-90,0,0]) 
                    countersunk_8_32(length=screw_depth);
        }
    }

The guide for the broomstick:

// create a screwhole for metric screw of given length,
// with head extending in -z direction and screw in +z direction
// Loose=0.10 for loose fit, 0.05 for tight fit, about -0.15 for threaded hole
module screw_hole(metric_size=3, length=10, loose=0.10)
{   union()
    {   cylinder(d=metric_size*(1+loose), h=length*1.1, $fs=0.3);  // body of screw
    translate([0,0,-metric_size]) cylinder(d=metric_size*2.2, h=metric_size*1.1, $fs=0.3);  // counterbore for head of screw
    }
}

// make countersunk hole for flathead screw
// surface on xy plane at (0,0), screw extends in +z direction.
// length is the length of the hole for the threads (past the base of the head)
// diam is the diameter of the hole for the screw threads
// depth is the depth of the countersink
// top_diam is the diameter at the surface (the xy plane)
module countersunk(length=35, diam=5, depth=3, top_diam=11)
{
    union()
    {    cylinder (d=diam, h=length+depth, $fs=0.3);   // hole for screw
        // countersink (adding 0.001 overshoot to avoid coincident faces)
        translate([0,0,-0.001]) cylinder (d1=top_diam+0.2, d2=diam, h=depth+0.1, $fs=0.3); 
    }
}

// make countersunk hole for 10-24 flathead machine screw
module countersunk_10_24(length, diam=5, depth=3, top_diam=11)
{     countersunk(length=length, diam=diam, top_diam=top_diam, depth=depth);
} 

// make countersunk hole for #9 flathead wood screw
module countersunk_9(length, diam=4.4, top_diam=8.3, depth=4)
{     countersunk(length=length, diam=diam, top_diam=top_diam, depth=depth);
} 

// make countersunk hole for 8-32 flathead wood screw 
module countersunk_8_32(length=22, diam=4.3, top_diam=7.6, depth=3.2)
{
    countersunk(length=length, diam=diam, top_diam=top_diam, depth=depth);
}

module rounded_posy_cube(x,y,z,radius=1)
{
    difference()
    {    cube([x,y,z]);
         translate([0,y,0]) 
            cube([2*radius,2*radius, 2*z+1], center=true);
         translate([x,y,0]) 
            cube([2*radius,2*radius, 2*z+1], center=true);
    }
    translate([radius, y-radius, 0]) cylinder(r=radius, h=z, $fs=0.1);
    translate([x-radius, y-radius, 0]) cylinder(r=radius, h=z, $fs=0.1);
}

U_diam=26;
inner_depth=28;
thickness=6;

U_radius = U_diam/2;
center_y = inner_depth-U_radius;
outer_height = inner_depth+thickness;

width = 60;
length = 34; // length of plate
thickness = 6;

screw_length=outer_height+2; 

// screw_x = max(U_radius+thickness+2.2, width/2-thickness-2.2);
screw_x=21;   // (moved in slightly to engage wood better)
screw_y = outer_height+0.001;
screw_z = 8;
screw_holes=true;

notch_angle = atan(center_y/U_radius);
notch_depth = 2;
notch_radius= 5;

notch_offset = U_radius+notch_depth-notch_radius;
notch_x = cos(notch_angle)*notch_offset;
notch_y = center_y + sin(notch_angle)*notch_offset;

test=false;   // set to trim the model in Z for fast printing of
    // a size test

rotate([-90,0,0])   // to make this "legs up" when printing
difference()
{   translate([-width/2,0,0]) 
        rounded_posy_cube(width,outer_height, length, radius=3);
    
    // hole for handle
    translate([0,center_y,-0.01])
        cylinder(d=U_diam, h=length+0.02, $fn=100);
    
    //extend hole to base 
    translate([-U_radius,-0.01,-0.02])
        cube([U_diam,center_y+0.02, length+0.04]);
  
    // cut notch to allow screw head through
    translate([notch_x, notch_y, -1])
        cylinder(r=notch_radius, h=length+2, $fs=0.1);
    // cut notch to allow screw head through
    translate([-notch_x, 2*center_y-notch_y, -1])
        cylinder(r=notch_radius, h=length+2, $fs=0.1);

    if (screw_holes)
    {    
        translate([screw_x, screw_y, screw_z])
            rotate([90,0,0]) 
                countersunk_9(length=screw_length);
        translate([-screw_x, screw_y, screw_z])
            rotate([90,0,0]) 
                countersunk_9(length=screw_length);
        translate([screw_x, screw_y, length-screw_z])
            rotate([90,0,0]) 
                countersunk_9(length=screw_length);
        translate([-screw_x, screw_y, length-screw_z])
            rotate([90,0,0]) 
                countersunk_9(length=screw_length);
    }
    
    if (test)
    {   // just include up through the lower screw hole
        translate([-width,-1, screw_z+6])
            cube([2*width, 2*outer_height, length]);
    }
}

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