Gas station without pumps

2022 April 8

Press release for my book

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 22:29
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World Scientific Publishing has released a press release for my book at https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/949205.  That press release is lightly edited from one I wrote for them.

The press release does not point to the lower-cost PDF version at https://leanpub.com/applied_analog_electronics, but I can’t really expect World Scientific to advertise the cheaper option, even though they did allow me to continue selling it.  They have not given me permission to use their cover design

Blue-cover

Blue cover

for my PDF sales, so I will continue to use my own design:

colorized-draft4-464x600

I’m not that fond of their all-caps typesetting anyway, and the generic “tech” background has nothing to do with the contents of the book—but if they think that generic tech backgrounds sell better, I’m willing to believe them, as they have much more experience selling books than I do.

The text for the two versions of the book should be identical, but they are resetting it (with smaller headings and some other formatting changes), so the pagination will be different.

2022 January 4

Book scheduled to come out in June

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 17:56
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My book now has a web page with World Scientific Publishing (https://www.worldscientific.com/worldscibooks/10.1142/12781) with price information and a DOI.  The claim there is that the book will be available in June at $88 for paperback and $178 for hardback (a rather larger premium for the hardback than I had expected).  Of course, the PDF version will continue to be available for $7.99 from https://leanpub.com/applied_analog_electronics.

I have to write a press release (about 500 words and expressing something novel that would attract science writers). Writing press releases is not one of my strong skills—I’m not sure what spin to put on the book to attract science writers.  I know what I like about the book and why I wrote it, but I’m not sure I can encapsulate that in a press release that would attract attention.

Anyone have any advice for the press release?

I also have to decide whether to buy an ad in the July 2022 “Stanford Authors” issue of Stanford magazine.  It would be $525 for about 400 characters and a picture of the book cover, which I’d be unlikely to recover in direct sales, but if one of the people seeing the book there adopted it for a course, the ad might break even. The magazine claims about 200k readers.

Should I buy the Stanford ad?

2021 December 14

Which cover?

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 14:50
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My publisher has sent me 3 mock-ups of the cover for the book.  Which of them do you think will sell best?  (I know which one I like best, I think, but that is less important than how well the book will sell.)  I’ve converted their files to PNG for the blog—the real covers have much better resolution.

Peach-cover

Peach cover

Blue-cover

Blue cover

Brown-cover

Brown cover

2021 Dec 28: We’re going with the blue cover.

2021 December 2

Help needed with writing blurb

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 08:56
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I need to write a draft blurb for my textbook as part of the “promotional questionnaire”, and that is something I’ve always been bad at.  I’ve not been able to make the book sound as good as I think it is. Can anyone provide some suggestions?

Here is what I have so far:

2. Book Information

2.1. Describe the aims and scope of the book.

This textbook is for a first course on electronics. It assumes no prior electronics experience, but does assume that students have had calculus 1 (single-variable differential calculus) and high-school physics. A key idea of the course is that students need a lot of design experience and hands-on work, rather than a lot of theory. The course is centered around the labs, which are a mix of design labs and measurement/modeling labs.

The book is also intended for hobbyists and students on a limited budget to be able to learn from without a course. The inexpensive equipment needed is described in the Preface.

The book is intended to take students from knowing no electronics to being able to design and build amplifier and filter circuits for connecting sensors to microcontrollers within 20 weeks.  Students design a digital thermometer, a blood-pressure meter, an optical pulse monitor, an EKG, an audio preamplifier, and a class-D power amplifier.  They also learn how to measure and characterize components, including impedance spectroscopy of a loudspeaker and of electrochemical electrodes.

2.2 Explain why the book is important in the field or market. Feel free to elaborate on the value it can provide to the readers.

Many educators have seen the need for getting engineering students to do hands-on projects early in their education, but few textbooks exist to support ambitious projects with few prerequisites—most either develop foundational math and never get to design or assume that the foundations have already been covered in a previous course.  This book was deliberately written for a design-first approach, in which the design projects are the center of the course, with just-in-time teaching of concepts as they are needed for the projects.

The book focusses on three building-block concepts that are used over and over: voltage dividers, complex impedance, and negative-feedback amplifiers.  Despite the simplicity of these concepts, they provide powerful tools for doing design.

The book does not shy away from non-linear components, as it has students design a log-transimpedance amplifier for the optical pulse monitor and uses FETs as switches in the class-D power amplifier.

Although the book can certainly be used for teaching electrical engineering majors, it was aimed primarily at non-EE engineering majors (bioengineers).

2.3. Describe 3 key selling points of your book (e.g., how it differs from competing titles; unique treatment of certain topics; new edition/material; prominent authors or contributors).

  1. This book is centered around the design labs, rather than using labs just to illustrate concepts, the concepts are introduced just in time to support the work of the labs. Design is started right away, rather than building a lot of foundations with the usual empty promise that they will be useful “later”.
  2. The labs are mostly centered around the small amount of analog electronics needed for connecting sensors to computers and are chosen to appeal to a wide range of  engineering students, not just electrical engineers. In fact, bioengineering students were the primary audience for the first several years, and many labs are measuring heart function (blood pressure, optical pulse measurement, and EKG). The class-D power-amp lab also introduces H-bridges, which are a major concept for motor controllers and mechatronics.
  3. Three basic concepts (voltage dividers, complex impedance, and negative-feedback amplifiers) are used over and over in different ways, encouraging students to learn engineering as creative reuse of building blocks, rather than as memorizing piles of unrelated formulas.

2021 October 1

Edition 1.3 released today!

Filed under: Circuits course — gasstationwithoutpumps @ 21:50
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I finally released the new version of the textbook Applied Analog Electronics today at https://leanpub.com/applied_analog_electronics. The book is a little longer than the previous editions:

Edition 1.1 Edition 1.2 Edition 1.3 type
659 673 691 pages
337 342 348 figures
14 14 14 tables
515 523 528 index entries
162 162 169 references

The newest edition adds a new section in the active-filters chapter, some additional explanation at the beginning of the FETs chapter, a constant-current circuit for electroplating the Ag/AgCl electrodes, and a few pieces of advice in the design report guidelines.

The chapter on design report guidelines is available free as a separate publication:
https://leanpub.com/design_report_guidelines

The minimum price is still $7.99, but I’m doing a special one-month coupon that lowers the price to $5.99, just for my loyal blog readers! One nice thing about selling through Leanpub is that purchasers get all future editions published through Leanpub as part of the price—the company is trying to encourage authors to publish book drafts through them, rather than waiting until the book is completely polished. That means that people who bought (even with free coupons) earlier versions of the book will get this release for free, and anyone who buys now will get the benefit of future releases. I will still provide coupons for free copies to instructors who are considering using the textbook for a course—contact me if you need a copy!

As before, I am still offering 25¢ rewards for the first report of each error (no matter how small) in the book.

I have recorded video lectures for the book. Playlists are at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQCrrTKnAE-97LcrJuUQ_5wKBFil8An9i for the first course and https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQCrrTKnAE–khjVV52ZWU_Usc3e6KV9J for the second course. The first playlist of 122 videos runs about 27:16 and the second playlist of 50 videos runs about 12 hours, so the average video length is under 14 minutes.

There may be one or two videos added and existing ones may be updated, but the set of lectures is essentially complete. Many still have only automatic closed captioning, but the captions will (slowly) get hand edited.

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